Categories
Deploy360 IPv6

Slides: IPv6 and Telecom – IPv4 Is FInally Running Out. Now What?

What is the impact of IPv6 on telecommunications, including Voice-over-IP (VoIP) and Unified Communications (UC)?  I recently presented in a webinar for US Telecom on exactly that topic – and my slides for the session are now available:

The webinar was recorded and I’m told that if you register you can view the archive of the session.  There were some excellent questions asked at the end that you can hear through the recording.

As more of the Internet moves to IPv6, it’s definitely important for telecommunications to work over IPv6 – to help with that we are continuing to compile a list of resources related to IPv6 and VoIP/UC/telecom.  Please do check the list out – and also please let us know of any additional resources we should add!

If you are looking to get started with IPv6, please do check out our “Start Here” pages where you can find resources relating to your type of company or organization.

Categories
IPv6

Slides: IPv6 and Telecom – IPv4 Is FInally Running Out. Now What?

What is the impact of IPv6 on telecommunications, including Voice-over-IP (VoIP) and Unified Communications (UC)?  I recently presented in a webinar for US Telecom on exactly that topic – and my slides for the session are now available:

The webinar was recorded and I’m told that if you register you can view the archive of the session.  There were some excellent questions asked at the end that you can hear through the recording.

As more of the Internet moves to IPv6, it’s definitely important for telecommunications to work over IPv6 – to help with that we are continuing to compile a list of resources related to IPv6 and VoIP/UC/telecom.  Please do check the list out – and also please let us know of any additional resources we should add!

If you are looking to get started with IPv6, please do check out our “Start Here” pages where you can find resources relating to your type of company or organization.

Categories
Deploy360 IPv6

No Jitter: IPv6 Impact on VoIP

No Jitter logoHow well do voice-over-IP (VoIP) and unified communications (UC) systems work with IPv6?  That’s a topic that has long been a personal passion of mine – and we maintain a page here on Deploy360 specifically about IPv6 and VoIP/UC systems. So naturally I was very pleased when right before the holidays on December 20, 2013, Gary Audin wrote a piece on the No Jitter site about IPv6 and VoIP.

Gary identifies several issues that enterprises need to think about with regard to migrating their VoIP systems to IPv6, including:

  • Increased bandwidth needs due to expanded IPv6 headers
  • Upgrading IP PBXs, IP phones, softphones and gateways to IPv6
  • Running dual stack operations with both IPv4 and IPv6
  • Network Address Translation modifications
  • Port sharing for signaling protocols

From my own perspective of having worked in the VoIP field  I think his second bullet is probably going to be the most problematic, particularly the IP phones.  Many of the older IP desk phones used by enterprises are severely resource constrained and may not be able to support dual-stack operations and may not be upgraded to IPv6.  In many cases it may be the newer IP phones and the softphones that will lead the way to IPv6.

But interestingly in this article Gary is more focused on the potential bandwidth increases.  He’s right that one of the differences in VoIP traffic from, say, web or file traffic is that VoIP is composed of a zillion tiny packets. This has to do with how most VoIP systems use a very small sampling size – they slice the voice stream into very tiny pieces, typically around 20 milliseconds, and then send those pieces in individual packets.

So, given all the tiny little packets, any increase in the overall size of the VoIP packets results in an increase in bandwidth.  Gary’s argument is that the increased size of IPv6 headers will have an impact on bandwidth.  Not necessarily a huge impact, perhaps only a 10% increase in needed bandwidth, but still, there will be an impact. Though I have not done the math as Gary has to make his table, I can see his argument.

His main point, really, is that as enterprises plan their moves to IPv6 they need to think not only about potential software and hardware upgrades, but also about additional bandwidth requirements.  It’s good advice to think about.

Are you ready to migrate your VoIP or UC system to IPv6?  Or have you already done so?  If you haven’t, check out our page on VoIP and UC resources for IPv6 – and if you have already done so, we’d love to talk to you about writing up a case study! 🙂

Categories
IPv6

No Jitter: IPv6 Impact on VoIP

No Jitter logoHow well do voice-over-IP (VoIP) and unified communications (UC) systems work with IPv6?  That’s a topic that has long been a personal passion of mine – and we maintain a page here on Deploy360 specifically about IPv6 and VoIP/UC systems. So naturally I was very pleased when right before the holidays on December 20, 2013, Gary Audin wrote a piece on the No Jitter site about IPv6 and VoIP.

Gary identifies several issues that enterprises need to think about with regard to migrating their VoIP systems to IPv6, including:

  • Increased bandwidth needs due to expanded IPv6 headers
  • Upgrading IP PBXs, IP phones, softphones and gateways to IPv6
  • Running dual stack operations with both IPv4 and IPv6
  • Network Address Translation modifications
  • Port sharing for signaling protocols

From my own perspective of having worked in the VoIP field  I think his second bullet is probably going to be the most problematic, particularly the IP phones.  Many of the older IP desk phones used by enterprises are severely resource constrained and may not be able to support dual-stack operations and may not be upgraded to IPv6.  In many cases it may be the newer IP phones and the softphones that will lead the way to IPv6.

But interestingly in this article Gary is more focused on the potential bandwidth increases.  He’s right that one of the differences in VoIP traffic from, say, web or file traffic is that VoIP is composed of a zillion tiny packets. This has to do with how most VoIP systems use a very small sampling size – they slice the voice stream into very tiny pieces, typically around 20 milliseconds, and then send those pieces in individual packets.

So, given all the tiny little packets, any increase in the overall size of the VoIP packets results in an increase in bandwidth.  Gary’s argument is that the increased size of IPv6 headers will have an impact on bandwidth.  Not necessarily a huge impact, perhaps only a 10% increase in needed bandwidth, but still, there will be an impact. Though I have not done the math as Gary has to make his table, I can see his argument.

His main point, really, is that as enterprises plan their moves to IPv6 they need to think not only about potential software and hardware upgrades, but also about additional bandwidth requirements.  It’s good advice to think about.

Are you ready to migrate your VoIP or UC system to IPv6?  Or have you already done so?  If you haven’t, check out our page on VoIP and UC resources for IPv6 – and if you have already done so, we’d love to talk to you about writing up a case study! 🙂

Categories
Deploy360 Domain Name System Security Extensions (DNSSEC)

New Kamailio DNSSEC Module Enables Higher Security For SIP / VoIP

Kamailio LogoIf you are using voice-over-IP (VoIP), and specifically the Session Initiation Protocol (SIP), how do you know if you are really connecting to the correct SIP server when you make a connection?  When you call someone, your SIP server needs to make a connection to the SIP server for the recipient – how is it sure it is reaching the correct server?

As I’ve talked about and written about in the past, one way to help with this is to use DNSSEC to validate that the information received by the SIP server from DNS is in fact accurate.  While DNSSEC support in VoIP systems has been somewhat limited to date, the great Kamailio team has added a module that provides DNSSEC support.  It will be included in the forthcoming Kamailio 4.1 release (whose development was recently frozen, so it should be available soon), but in the meantime it can be added to Kamailio installations using this tutorial:

http://www.kamailio.org/wiki/tutorials/dns/dnssec

The actual module itself can be found at:

http://kamailio.org/docs/modules/devel/modules/dnssec.html

This kind of support for DNSSEC within VoIP is great to see and will lead to more secure communications over IP in the future.  Plus, getting this kind of DNSSEC support out there now will lay the groundwork for potentially using DANE in the future to secure the certificates used in VoIP communications.

Congrats to the Kamailio team and we look forward to learning more about people using this module in the future!

P.S. See our DNSSEC and DNSSEC Basics pages to learn more about how you can get started with DNSSEC.

Categories
Deploy360 IPv6 To archive

SIP Forum IPv6 Task Group Call – Weds, Oct 3rd, 19:00 CEST, 1:00pm US Eastern

SIP ForumThe SIP Forum IPv6 Task Group will be having its next conference call today, October 3, 2013, at: 19:00 CEST, 18:00 BST (UK) and 1:00 pm US Eastern (and see other times). Task Group co-chair Andy Hutton sent out this agenda and call-in information:

  1. Status of the draft for developers
  2. Status of mine and Gonzalo’s draft to update RFC 3263
  3. Happy Eyeballs for SIP
    3.1. Connection oriented
    3.2. UDP
  4. IPv6 and related protocols
    4.1. MSRP
    4.2. XCAP/HTTP
    4.3. ICE/turn
    4.4. Other related protocols

Anyone is welcome to join the SIP Forum’s IPv6 mailing list and also to join in the effort.  The group is working to “evaluate current best practices and enable and promote migration to SIP over IPv6.”

It’s great to see the work they are doing because we definitely do need to have IP-based telecommunications working over IPv6!

Categories
IPv6

SIP Forum IPv6 Task Group Call – Weds, Oct 3rd, 19:00 CEST, 1:00pm US Eastern

SIP ForumThe SIP Forum IPv6 Task Group will be having its next conference call today, October 3, 2013, at: 19:00 CEST, 18:00 BST (UK) and 1:00 pm US Eastern (and see other times). Task Group co-chair Andy Hutton sent out this agenda and call-in information:

  1. Status of the draft for developers
  2. Status of mine and Gonzalo’s draft to update RFC 3263
  3. Happy Eyeballs for SIP
    3.1. Connection oriented
    3.2. UDP
  4. IPv6 and related protocols
    4.1. MSRP
    4.2. XCAP/HTTP
    4.3. ICE/turn
    4.4. Other related protocols

Anyone is welcome to join the SIP Forum’s IPv6 mailing list and also to join in the effort.  The group is working to “evaluate current best practices and enable and promote migration to SIP over IPv6.”

It’s great to see the work they are doing because we definitely do need to have IP-based telecommunications working over IPv6!

Categories
Deploy360 IPv6 To archive

Next “SIP Over IPv6” Task Group Call On Thursday, June 20,

SIP ForumFor those interested in helping make Voice-over-IP (VoIP) work over IPv6, and specifically VoIP using the Session Initiation Protocol (SIP), the next conference call of the SIP Forum’s “SIP Over IPv6” Task Group happens tomorrow, Thursday, June 20, 2013, at:

19:00 Central European Summer Time
18:00 British Summer Time
13:00 US Eastern Daylight Time
10:00 US Pacific Daylight Time

The dial-in number will be +1 972 756 9798 with a conference PIN  of 009444.  Additional country-specific dial-in numbers can be found in the email announcement.

In the agenda announcement from Rifaat Shekh-Yusef the items to be discussed include:

1. draft-klatsky-dispatch-ipv6-impact-ipv4

  • Discuss the feedback and how to continue the discussion on the DISPATCH mailing list
  • *Talk about the options for moving the document forward (AD sponsor vs. new WG)

2. Discuss the text for two new sections that Mohamed Boucadair provided.
(See “IPv6 Implementation Guidelines” & “IPv6/IPv4 Interworking Function: Avoid IPv6 address Leakage?” in the attached document)

  • Should these be added to this draft, which means that we are extending the scope of this draft? or
  • Should we create a separate draft?

3. Happy Eyeballs

4. Sunset4 WG
We received an email of interest from Marc Blanchet, co-chair of sunset4 wg, stating that this work is relevant to the work they are chartered to do.
Marc suggested that we socialize this work with the sunset4 wg, which I did already. He also suggested that we present this work during the coming IETF in Berlin.

We’re delighted to see this ongoing work within the SIP Forum and that several documents are now under consideration.  We do encourage anyone interested in helping SIP work over IPv6 to participate in this call and to join the SIP Forum “IPv6” mailing list for this task group.

For more information about VoIP / SIP and IPv6, please see our page on IPv6 and IP Communications.

Categories
IPv6

Next "SIP Over IPv6" Task Group Call On Thursday, June 20,

SIP ForumFor those interested in helping make Voice-over-IP (VoIP) work over IPv6, and specifically VoIP using the Session Initiation Protocol (SIP), the next conference call of the SIP Forum’s “SIP Over IPv6” Task Group happens tomorrow, Thursday, June 20, 2013, at:

19:00 Central European Summer Time
18:00 British Summer Time
13:00 US Eastern Daylight Time
10:00 US Pacific Daylight Time

The dial-in number will be +1 972 756 9798 with a conference PIN  of 009444.  Additional country-specific dial-in numbers can be found in the email announcement.

In the agenda announcement from Rifaat Shekh-Yusef the items to be discussed include:

1. draft-klatsky-dispatch-ipv6-impact-ipv4

  • Discuss the feedback and how to continue the discussion on the DISPATCH mailing list
  • *Talk about the options for moving the document forward (AD sponsor vs. new WG)

2. Discuss the text for two new sections that Mohamed Boucadair provided.
(See “IPv6 Implementation Guidelines” & “IPv6/IPv4 Interworking Function: Avoid IPv6 address Leakage?” in the attached document)

  • Should these be added to this draft, which means that we are extending the scope of this draft? or
  • Should we create a separate draft?

3. Happy Eyeballs

4. Sunset4 WG
We received an email of interest from Marc Blanchet, co-chair of sunset4 wg, stating that this work is relevant to the work they are chartered to do.
Marc suggested that we socialize this work with the sunset4 wg, which I did already. He also suggested that we present this work during the coming IETF in Berlin.

We’re delighted to see this ongoing work within the SIP Forum and that several documents are now under consideration.  We do encourage anyone interested in helping SIP work over IPv6 to participate in this call and to join the SIP Forum “IPv6” mailing list for this task group.

For more information about VoIP / SIP and IPv6, please see our page on IPv6 and IP Communications.

Categories
Deploy360 Domain Name System Security Extensions (DNSSEC)

Speaking Live On VUC Podcast About DNSSEC And VoIP/UC on Friday, May 3

VUC logoWould you like to chat with me (Dan York) about DNSSEC and DANE and how they might work with voice-over-IP (VoIP) and unified communications (UC)? Or would you just like to listen to my views on the subject?

If so, you can join in to the live “VoIP Users Conference (VUC)” conference call / podcast at 1:00pm US Eastern on Friday, May 1, May 3, 2013.

Based off of some of the information I shared in my SIPNOC presentation last week about DNSSEC and VoIP, I’ll be giving an overview of both DNSSEC and DANE and then opening a conversation about what possibilities there might be to use DNSSEC/DANE to provide a higher level of security to VoIP and other forms of IP telecom.

I’ll also be pointing people to our new “DNSSEC and IP Communications” page where I’m starting to list some of the VoIP tools and services out there now that work with DNSSEC (and I’m looking for more items to add).

To join the call, you can either connect in to the Google+ Hangout at 1:00 pm US Eastern – or alternatively call in via the SIP, Skype or regular old phone numbers listed on the top of the VUC page for the episode. There is also an IRC backchannel where text chat occurs during the episodes.

If you can’t listen live, the show will be recorded and you can listen to it later.

I’ve been a participant in the VUC shows for several years and it’s a good group of people and always some interesting conversation. They happen every Friday normally at 12 noon US Eastern – but due to a scheduling conflict I’m going on at 1:00pm.  Do tune in tomorrow and join us in the conversation about DNSSEC and VoIP!

Categories
Deploy360 Domain Name System Security Extensions (DNSSEC) IPv6

Video: Emil Ivov about Jitsi, a VoIP softphone supporting IPv6 and DNSSEC

jitsi.jpgThe Jitsi audio/video softphone and messaging client supports both IPv6 and DNSSEC.  How did it get started with IPv6 support?  Why did it add DNSSEC? What value does DNSSEC add to VoIP and IP communications?   We first wrote about Jitsi’s DNSSEC support almost a year ago, but earlier this month at IETF86 I had a chance to sit down with Jitsi project lead Emil Ivov and ask him these questions and much more:

Jitsi is available for Windows, Mac OS X and Linux from:  http://jitsi.org/  It used to be called the “SIP Communicator” but when they added support for XMPP (Jabber) and XMPP/Jingle back in 2011 they changed the name to be Jitsi.

Given my own personal interest in VoIP / IP communications, I’m planning to write a bit more about Jitsi as I get a chance to do so.  If any of you use Jitsi and create any screencasts about its IPv6 or DNSSEC support – or write up any articles about those capabilities – please do let us know as I’d like to include more on our site about this great project.

Categories
Deploy360 IPv6

Next SIP Forum “SIP Over IPv6” Call on January 9th

UPDATE – Jan 9, 2012: Unfortunately due to some scheduling conflicts, the call on January 9th was cancelled.  There will be discussion on the SIP Forum discussion list to determine the date of the next call.

SIP Forum

One week from today, on January 9, the SIP Forum’s “SIP Over IPv6 Task Group” will be having it’s next conference call.  Andy Hutton, co-chair of the group, provided notes of last call where discussion continued about how to move efforts forward.  As he notes, a message with an agenda and more details should be sent to the list soon (you can check the list archive).

As I wrote about before, this Task Group is an important step toward getting more Voice over IP (VoIP) communication happening over IP.  If you are interested in getting more involved, the Task Group web page explains more about what the group is doing – and the SIP Forum IPv6 mailing list is open to all to join.