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IPv6

Google IPv6 Traffic Passes 5% – IPv6 Internet Growing Faster than IPv4!

We’ve been watching IPv6 traffic numbers climb ever since World IPv6 Day, and today we’re excited to see that the Google IPv6 traffic graph (pictured above) has crossed a nice round number – 5%. This means that 5% of all traffic globally reaching Google’s servers uses IPv6 as the Internet Protocol of choice. This is great news because IPv6 deployment and use means the Internet can continue to grow!

Even better, there are several countries around the world where more than 10% of the traffic from networks in those countries use IPv6 – Belgium, Luxembourg, Germany, and the US – with several others close to that mark. Akamai reports similar numbers in its global per-country measurements. This is all very exciting progress as we march toward full deployment of IPv6 across the globe.

Earlier this year we predicted double digit IPv6 traffic by the end of 2014. That was a very aggressive and optimistic prediction meant to grab headlines and prompt action, and we didn’t quite make it to that target. In reality, traffic growth this year has been slower than in 2013. I’m happy to see IPv6 still increasing steadily, but of course I wish it had continued along a growth path that looked something like an S-curve. Still, it is growth, and most importantly, it means that the IPv6 Internet is growing faster than the IPv4 Internet.

When I look at the new networks that have been joining the global deployment of IPv6, as reported in our World IPv6 Launch measurements, I’m hopeful that the growth in IPv6 will continue and the rate of growth will increase. We’re beginning to see multiple mobile networks rolling out IPv6 and growth in that realm can accelerate the footprint of IPv6 rapidly.

While 5% might not seem like a large percentage, it’s a big step on the path to IPv6 becoming the prominent Internet Protocol on the Internet, and billions more people and devices being able to connect to an Internet that works like the one we’ve enjoyed and benefitted from so far. And that’s worth celebrating.

What is your network planning to do with IPv6 deployment in 2015? Our Deploy360 Programme can help you get started!

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IPv6

Akamai Adds IPv6 Trend Visualizations to State of the Internet Reporting

We are very pleased to see that today Akamai has started publishing a very detailed view of what they see for IPv6 usage on the Internet. Akamai has been contributing IPv6 measurements to our World IPv6 Launch monthly measurements and we’re pleased to see these more detailed visualizations become available.

This is a really nice tool that allows you to see what they see in terms of a view of IPv6 deployment by country and by network. Whereas the World IPv6 Launch measurements are an opt-in measurement for networks, Akamai publishes data from every network where they see IPv6 traffic, so they report some large deployments that we don’t have in our data. Kabel Deutschland is an example of a network with a large IPv6 deployment (35% of the traffic coming from their network to Akamai’s servers uses IPv6) that isn’t in our database.

It is nice to see half a dozen countries where more than 10% of the traffic from networks in those countries use IPv6.

These new IPv6 visualizations from Akamai join with other similar trend metrics from Google, APNIC, Cisco and others to show that IPv6 deployment is making major steps forward all around the world. Many thanks to the Akamai team for making these visualizations publicly available.

P.S. If you have not started moving to IPv6, why not get started today?

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IPv6

Vint Cerf: We Need To Move To The Production Version Of The Internet (IPv6)

We need to stop running the experimental version of the Internet and move to the production version of the Internet running IPv6!  This was one of the key points made by Vint Cerf in a Google+ Hangout back in April 2014.  We wrote about the event then, but today on World IPv6 Launchiversary it is definitely worth sharing again.  As Vint notes, when the Internet was first being created, it was always a grand experiment.  Many of the folks involved thought that at some point we’d leave the “experimental” Internet behind and move to the “production” version… but yet many people haven’t yet made that leap!  Vint asked everyone to contact their Internet Service Providers (ISPs) and ask when they will be able to get IPv6… and we’d ask you again to please do that today!

The interview with Vint Cerf covers a wide range of topics about the Internet… if you have some time it’s a great video to watch.  And then… if you haven’t yet moved to the production version of the Internet, please visit our “Start Here” pages to find out how you can get going with IPv6 today!

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IPv6

Check Out The New 2-Year World IPv6 Launchiversary Infographic!

Today in celebration of the second anniversary of World IPv6 Launch, there is a new infographic available that talks about what has changed with IPv6 since June 6, 2012.  You can find it at http://www.worldipv6launch.org/infographic/ or by clicking the image below.  Please do share it with people to let them know how millions of people around the world are now able to communicate over IPv6!

UPDATE: You can now also download a PDF version of the 2014 infographic if you would like a version for printing or sharing as a PDF.

wipv6l2-infographic-partial

Categories
IPv6 Open Internet Standards Technology

World IPv6 Launch Began Two Years Ago – Happy Launchiversary!

Today’s the day! It’s been two years since World IPv6 Launch in 2012, the day major Internet service providers (ISPs), home networking equipment manufacturers, and web companies around the world started permanently enabling IPv6 for their products and services. All this week we’ve been celebrating the “Launchiversary” with blog posts, social media activities, and lots of new content.

I put together my thoughts in a blog post earlier this week about where we started, where we are now, and where we’re going. I also wanted to share a few specific activities that have been going on this week:

It’s been two years since World IPv6 Launch began. What are you doing to deploy IPv6 on your network?

Happy Launchiversary!

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IPv6

Celebrating World IPv6 Launch – Happy Second Launchiversary!

This week, on 6 June, we mark two years since World IPv6 Launch in 2012. It’s worthwhile taking a moment to reflect on what has happened in those two years – there’s a new infographic on the World IPv6 Launch site on that – and what remains still to be done. Mat Ford wrote a post on the World IPv6 Launch blog observing how v6 has grown measurably in the last two years. The choice of “Launch” to describe this was an excellent one. It was the beginning of IPv6 deployment on a large commercial scale that continues to accelerate as more and more network operators enable IPv6 for their users. It’s very gratifying to see such good progress.

But it’s not yet time to relax our efforts to get more IPv6 deployed. The effort is more like a marathon than a sprint, and persistent effort is still needed. What I would most like to see is a stronger commitment to IPv6 deployment from mobile operators around the world. Both Verizon Wireless and T-Mobile USA in North America have substantial and growing deployments showing that it is indeed possible for mobile networks to deploy. I’ve heard privately from several mobile operators that they are working vigorously to make similar offering in their networks so I’m hopeful we will begin to see more IPv6 from mobile networks in the coming months.

It would also be great to see more of the popular websites enable IPv6 for their services. It’s great that the five most visited English language websites use IPv6 (Google, YouTube, Facebook, Yahoo!, and Wikipedia) and that the percentage of Alexa 1000 sites using IPv6 has continued to increase. I’d be really happy to look at a chart and see the 50 most visited sites all using IPv6, or even the top 25.

Content and hosting companies are helping make more content available over IPv6. For example, CloudFlare enabled IPv6 for all their hosted sites earlier this year. This is an excellent step in the right direction and sets a great example for other companies.

It’s been two years since World IPv6 Launch began, but you can still get involved. Help us celebrate this week, read the official World IPv6 Launch blog, watch our Deploy360 blog for real-world case studies from organizations of all sizes deploying IPv6, and of course follow us on all our social media channels.

What are you doing to deploy IPv6 on your network?

Happy Launchiversary!

Categories
IPv6 Open Internet Standards Technology

IPv6 Traffic and Mobile Networks: Thoughts After World IPv6 Congress

Can we get more operators to share their IPv6 measurements? How many mobile operators are using an IPv6-only strategy for their networks? These were two of the questions we found ourselves discussing when we participated in the v6 World Congress in Paris a couple of weeks ago. I presented updated World IPv6 Launch statistics (embedded below) and actively listened to others in the industry discuss where they were, are, and will be with their IPv6 deployments. After the event, Alain Fiocco wrote a Cisco blog post summarizing the contents of the World IPv6 Congress and important next steps.

I’d like to call attention to two specific aspects of what was discussed there: operator perspectives on IPv6 traffic and IPv6 in mobile networks.

Alain points out that network operators who have turned up IPv6 would like to see more IPv6 traffic, which obviously requires more content being enabled on IPv6. We agree. It would be very helpful for operators to share their IPv6 measurements so the world can see what kind of IPv6 traffic is observed on a v6-enabled network. Martin Gysi of Swisscom last month wrote a guest post for our blog where he described what kind of IPv6 traffic he sees and where it is coming from. We ask others to do the same. If you operate a network that has IPv6 enabled, please share your measurements with the rest of us. It has a great impact on folks considering the timeline for their own deployments to see what to expect when they do enable IPv6.

Alain also called attention to the fact that several mobile operators made public statements about their plans to transition their networks to IPv6 using an IPv6-only strategy with 464xlat to get to content that hasn’t yet been enabled for IPv6. This is the strategy that T-Mobile in the United States is using and we report increased IPv6 traffic in their network each month (18% last month) in our World IPv6 Launch measurements. It is a great method for getting IPv6 deployed in a mobile network with a clear path to alleviate pain from lack of public (and private!) IP address space for growing networks.

I’d love to hear from you if you’re interested in contributing more operator perspectives on IPv6 networks, or if you’re a mobile operator working on your IPv6 transition. Either leave a comment here, or on our Twitter, Facebook, or Google+ channels!