Categories
Building Trust Improving Technical Security Privacy

Cybersecurity is the Top Internet Policy Concern in the Asia-Pacific Region

This month at the Asia-Pacific Regional IGF in Bangkok we will release the fourth annual Internet Society Survey Report on Internet Policy Issues in Asia-Pacific.

Findings from this year’s report show that cybersecurity, access, data protection, connectivity and privacy are the top five concerns for Internet users. These issues have more or less remained constant since 2014, however, not surprisingly this year cybersecurity has become the top issue.

Other issues that respondents expressed concern for relate to fake news, increasing digital surveillance that violates privacy rights, and more frequent instances of censorship and site-blocking that impact freedom of expression.

The survey polled more than 2,000 Internet users from across the Asia-Pacific region on their attitudes towards current Internet policy issues. This year, the survey took an in-depth look at how the region perceives and deals with personal information online, and the extent to which various entities are trusted to protect people’s personal information and privacy rights.

Generally, the results are rather discouraging. The findings indicate the current level of trust in the Internet is low. Users are concerned that their personal information is not protected online, and this in turn translates to their hesitance in using online services. A large proportion of respondents (60%) also indicated they do not have the knowledge and tools to protect their privacy online. These have important implications on the rollout and use of not only commercial, but also public and social services online.

At the same time, users want to be informed, and desire to have a certain level of control over the collection and use of their personal information. Public and private organisations that collect and share user information need to take this into account when formulating or updating privacy frameworks. This includes the development of systems and tools that make it easier for users to understand the terms of service, and empower users to manage their privacy preferences.

Interestingly, users recognise that the protection of personal information online is a shared responsibility – and not just the owner’s own responsibility. Both the public and private sectors, and especially the platforms through which users transact financially online, not only need to build robust and secure networks and systems, but also develop tools to equip users with the knowledge and skills to use these services safely online. This will improve their confidence in using online services, and their trust in the overall Internet ecosystem.

Read the full report here. Findings from past surveys are available here: 2014, 2015, 2016.


Read the Online Trust Audit, which includes checklist of best practices and resources.

Categories
Deploy360

Help Us! A 5-Minute Deployment Survey … With Raffle Prizes!

We Need You

Do you have about five minutes to help us out with our Deployment Survey? As we previously mentioned, we’re running a survey throughout the month of June. Have you deployed IPv6, DNSSEC, or improved your routing security? Did you use Deploy360 resources? Are you planning to deploy these technologies soon?

Is there something missing from our site that you wish you had known before you started? Is there another topic you wish we covered?

We’re five years old now, and we want to hear from you about how we can make Deploy360 even better … and more importantly, more useful for you.

Please take the survey and let us know how we can help you and move the needle on IPv6, DNSSEC, TLS, and more.

There’s an optional section at the end; if you fill in your email address, you’ll have a chance of winning a raffle prize!

A huge thank you if you’ve already taken the survey! Your feedback really means a lot to us.

Categories
Open Internet Standards

What will the Internet look like in the next 5-7 years?

We all know that the Internet is one of the most important tools of our time – but we can’t afford to take the Internet — or its future — for granted.

There are uncertainties facing the Internet – and how they evolve will have a profound impact on society and our ability to solve some of the world’s biggest challenges.

  • How might the Internet of the future look different than today?
  • How might key trends and uncertainties unfold to create different future paths?
  • What may be at risk and what could be impacted?

To help answer these and other questions, the Internet Society is embarking on a collaborative initiative to envision scenarios for the evolution of the Internet.

We will look at the trends and uncertainties impacting the Internet’s future, the issues of greatest concern globally and regionally, how various future scenarios could impact different uses of the Internet, and recommendations for creating the future Internet we want. 

Ultimately, we hope this process will help us all better prepare for the opportunities and challenges the future may hold. 

If you have questions, please feel free to contact us through our project e-mail address at FOTI@isoc.org.

Categories
Growing the Internet Improving Technical Security Internet Governance Public Policy

Net users in APAC want to participate in Internet policymaking

Governments in Asia-Pacific have made progress in opening up avenues for public input, but a new study by the Asia-Pacific Bureau suggests that stakeholders want more. The 2015 Asia-Pacific Regional Policy Survey, which collected the views of 3,302 Internet users from different sectors across the region, found that 87% of respondents would like their government to provide greater opportunities for them to be involved in Internet policymaking.

The same number stated that they care about Internet affairs in their own country, but only 28% rated themselves as having good or very good understanding of Internet policymaking processes. Some 90% agreed that policymakers also need a better understanding of Internet issues, with a further 82%  indicating that they were not fully satisfied with their government’s policies regarding the Internet. Such views are valuable as the Internet’s growing applicability to everyday life is expected to result in more states seeking to implement rules and regulations relating to cyberspace.

Governments in particular are seen to have a crucial role in enabling Internet access: some 99% of respondents thought that universal broadband access policies are integral in expanding Internet connectivity to under-served populations; and more than three-fourths believed that states should invest in developing Internet infrastructure, improving Internet speeds and making the Internet more affordable.

The report, released yesterday, found that connectivity continues to be the topmost concern among survey participants, with data protection, e-commerce, over-the-top services and cloud computing also ranking high on users’ radar. These priorities reflect the swiftly maturing online environment in Asia-Pacific. While many developing countries continue to grapple with slow and expensive Internet access, several emerging ones, including India and Indonesia, are also experiencing double-digit growth in Internet penetration. More developed economies like Japan, South Korea and Australia have at least three quarters of their population online, giving rise to policy concerns that are more often associated with increasing Internet ubiquity and utility.

The survey also took a closer look at cybersecurity, an area of growing concern in the region. The issue remains among the top 10 policy topics of interest among respondents, but with some caveats. Notably, 70% of survey participants felt that cybersecurity and civil liberties are equally important. And while 95% felt that government policies for cybersecurity are necessary, an equal number thought that online privacy protection should likewise be guaranteed by national law.

Download the full 2015 Asia-Pacific Regional Policy Survey report here.

Categories
Internet Governance

Internet Governance Survey: What You Told Us

What do people perceive to be the top issues facing the Internet today? How can stakeholders work more effectively together to strengthen the governance mechanisms meant to address these issues? And when it comes to the Internet Society, what should our role be and where should we focus our attention?

To help inform our work in Internet governance, we posed these and other questions to our community in February. We had an overwhelming response with over 800 people taking a few minutes of their time to answer our survey. The responses have been illuminating and the level of interest shown in this survey confirms that we are at a critical juncture in the global Internet governance discussion. It is clear that our community supports Internet governance to be a key focus for the Internet Society.

2015: A critical juncture for Internet governance

The Internet governance landscape is peppered with events and meetings this year as a number of key Internet policy issues are debated. There are key global, regional and local discussions underway about how to strengthen the Internet governance model in ways that will be meaningful to users around the globe, and how to be more inclusive of new ideas and perspectives. As we move through the rest of the year, we still have many issues to navigate:

  • The community must find a path for a successful IANA stewardship transition.
  • The mandate of the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) is up for renewal.
  • The role of new platforms such as the NETmundial Initiative (NMI) is being discussed.
  • The ten-year Review of the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS+10) will be held in December.

Our Community’s voice counts

Our community told us that:

  • Cybersecurity is the most important issue we need to face today;
  • Key priorities are to make Internet governance easier to understand, and to develop and share best practices amongst countries and communities.
  • Informal local and regional communities must be enhanced, and the global, regional, and national IGFs should be strengthened.
  • It is unclear whether NMI is needed for effective Internet governance.

What is clear from the results of the survey is that our community’s views are echoed in the Internet Society’s beliefs about what matters most. What our community told us means that we are already on a good path when it comes to our approach to the many Internet governance meetings and discussions yet to take place in 2015.

But there is fresh insight too, and our community has also proposed ways to enhance our Internet governance work and focus.

So What’s Next?

We are committed to addressing the priorities our community has set out, and also to stepping-up in the role our community is calling for us to play to strengthen Internet governance:

  • Convening dialogues and facilitating information sharing among all stakeholders: we will not shy away from difficult discussions and will aim to bridge stakeholders whether in UN missions, governments, Civil Society or industry headquarters.
  • Supporting platforms where best practices can be discussed in an open and inclusive manner: Our Chapters and members are at the heart of the IGF fabric. Building on the IGF Support Association and our efforts to develop local IGFs, we are in a unique position to help the IGF reach its full potential, on all continents.

Thank you to everyone who took the time to complete our survey. We greatly appreciate the valuable input and what this means in helping us to do more, better. Our next Community Forum on 15 April will be an opportunity to continue exchanging thoughts and we are looking forward to a fruitful dialogue.

Categories
Development Internet Governance

The voice of the Internet Society community: early numbers from IG Survey

A few weeks back, the Internet Society launched a survey to learn more from you, our community, about your priorities and views on Internet governance and how you think the Internet Society should engage on these important topics in 2015 and beyond.

We are thrilled with the level of response from the community. In total, we received over 800 replies from around the world in just 20 days!

We just concluded the survey last Friday and are still going over the data but I thought I’d share a first glimpse of the responses. While this was not a scientific survey, we hope that the results will offer a useful window into the kinds of issues our community cares about when it comes to Internet governance.

Overall, more than half of the total replies came from individuals who identified themselves as from the technical community.   Additionally, the survey was open to the broad Internet community, and nearly 10% of the replies came from non-ISOC members. And, we’re really excited to see that we had responses from all over the globe!

    •    Latin America  – 15%
•    Asia Pacific  – 20%
•    Europe – 23%
•    Africa  – 22%
•    Middle East – 4%
•    North America – 16%

So, thank you to all who contributed to this survey.   We will continue to analyze the results and will share a full report soon!

Meanwhile, the dialogue on these important issues continues:

ISOC-ICC-CS, IG Community Dialogue, 2 March, 12.00-14.00 UTC

ISOC community webinar on IANA: on the March 4th

Categories
Internet Governance

Take a Brief Survey to Help Strengthen Internet Governance in 2015

2015 is setting up to be another big and busy year for Internet governance discussions.   There are key global, regional and local discussions underway about how to strengthen the multistakeholder Internet governance model in ways that will be meaningful to Internet users around the globe and inclusive of new ideas and perspectives.  Some of the big issues for 2015 include: preparations for WSIS+10; the future of the IGF; the appropriate role of new platforms such as the NETmundial Initiative (NMI); and enabling a successful IANA stewardship transition.

Whew, it’s a lot to cover in one year!  And, of course, we want to hear from you all along the way.

As we think about how to engage in all of these various fora, we’d like to hear about your priorities and views on these important topics.  You’ll recall that late in 2014, following the announcement of the NMI launch, the Internet Society Board of Trustees called for a dialogue amongst our community on whether and how new initiatives in Internet governance should be formed.  The Board also reiterated its support for the IGF as a platform for Multistakeholder dialogue.   At the beginning of this year, the Internet Society CEO, Kathryn Brown, hosted a community forum to kick off community discussion about the critical work we have to do together in 2015.

Our next step is a brief survey on Internet governance to help us determine how to strengthen mechanisms of the Internet governance ecosystem to better address policy challenges in 2015. It is also designed to help the Internet Society to contribute to the current discussions on the evolution of the ecosystem. Your feedback and opinions will help us to understand the collective sentiment of our community and will inform our approach as we look to play our role to address these issues.

The questions should take approximately 10 minutes to complete and we would be grateful if you could find the time to respond.  The survey will be open from 2 to 20 February. A synthesis report of responses will be made available on our website shortly after the survey closes.

Please participate in this survey – it’s important that we hear from you!

Categories
Growing the Internet Identity Improving Technical Security Public Policy

Internet Access, Security Top Policy Concerns for South Asia

Policies on Internet connectivity and cybersecurity have emerged as issues of immediate concern in a survey of 855 Internet Society members across South Asia, topping other topical Internet-related themes in the sub-region. The study, part of a wider Asia-Pacific Regional Policy Survey conducted by the Internet Society’s Asia Pacific Bureau, yielded key insights on user attitudes towards local Internet policy issues just as several countries in South Asia mull provisions to increase Internet connection speeds and strengthen domestic cyberdefense strategies.

The survey report shows that close to two-thirds of respondents have been closely monitoring discussions around Internet connectivity in their own countries. Of particular concern was the availability and affordability of high-speed broadband access, which respondents viewed as crucial to increasing the economic and social benefits of the Internet for South Asia. Indeed, several respondents referred to quality of service assurances, amidst the sluggishness of Internet speed in the sub-region, as a possible focus area for regulators. More recently, Akamai’s latest “State of the Internet” quarterly report ranked India, the biggest economy in South Asia, as having the slowest average Internet connection speed, at 1.7Mbps, in Asia-Pacific, less than half the global average of 3.9Mbps.

Survey participants considered the persisting urban-rural digital divide, as well as the lack of multi-lingual, localised content as critical issues that must be addressed to further increase Internet uptake in South Asia.  Measures to help expand connectivity to more remote villages are crucial as 69% of the sub-region’s 1.64 billion people reside in rural areas.  Internet penetration in South Asia has likewise lagged behind the rest of Asia-Pacific—only 12% of its population currently have access to the Internet, almost three times lower than the global average of 35%.

Respondents likewise regarded cybersecurity, particularly in the realms of privacy, data protection and cybercrime, as an equally important policy theme for the sub-region. Amidst efforts by several South Asian countries to beef up their surveillance programmes, the survey found that many respondents strongly oppose pervasive monitoring by government. But while they disapproved of Internet censorship, survey participants also called for culturally sensitive content, voicing reservations about the spread of hate or extremist speech, as well as the proliferation of violent or sexually explicit images online.

There was a broad recognition of the need to raise user awareness of the risks associated with online activities, and of ways by which users can protect themselves from cyber threats. Rather than blanket institutional controls, however, respondents advocated for consumer rights policies that would prompt service providers to make available clear and simplified information on safe Internet usage and responsible online behaviour.

View the full Asia-Pacific Regional Policy Survey Report.

Subscribe to our monthly newsletter and stay up-to-date with the Internet Society’s work in Asia-Pacific.

Categories
Deploy360 Domain Name System Security Extensions (DNSSEC)

BT Releases Survey Results on DNSSEC Deployment

BT DNSSEC Survey ResultsYesterday BT’s Diamond IP group released their first DNSSEC Industry Survey Results that resulted from a survey of 120 participants from around the world in October 2012.  The key findings they report in the executive summary include:

  • Only 13 per cent of respondents have deployed DNSSEC signed zones in production and another five per cent are in the process of deployment. Even fewer have configured their caching recursive servers for DNSSEC validation with eight per cent having production deployments and another nine per cent progressing in deployment.
  • Despite modest deployments, nearly two-thirds of respondents agree or strongly agree that DNSSEC can provide organizational benefits and that DNSSEC technology is mature enough to deploy reliably. On the other hand, over half of respondents agreed that DNSSEC provides limited value until more validating resolvers are deployed, highlighting the “chicken and the egg” challenge for DNSSEC deployment.
  • Respondents generally agreed but were a bit unsure about supplementing DNSSEC deployments with hardware security modules (HSMs) with nearly half being neutral and over a third agreeing.
  • Leading obstacles to DNSSEC deployment were complexity of deployment and the inability to demonstrate a strong business case. Training issues and complexity of ongoing DNSSEC management caused concern as well.
  • Because DNSSEC requires knowledge of both DNS and cryptography to some degree, education and training programs may help improve industry awareness of the operation, benefits, and administrative requirements for deploying and maintaining DNSSEC secured resolution.

Most all of which is much inline with what we’ve seen in our own research and in fact the latter two points were precisely why we created the Deploy360 Programms – to get that kind of deployment information and education more widely known so that we can get DNSSEC more widely deployed.

I was particularly interested in the results on page 5 that asked about the value of DNSSEC.  Some of the answers were interesting – and also point to areas in which we as an industry need to provide better information to help people understand the value.  The “Top obstacles to DNSSEC deployment” chart on page 6 also agreed quite well with what we’ve heard from others.

One interesting question I’d not seen asked on other surveys about DNSSEC was about who would be responsible for the company’s DNSSEC implementation (page 8), with an interesting split between the “DNS” and “security” groups, highlighting an additional internal management challenge that may get involved with deploying DNSSEC:

The division makes a good bit of sense in that DNSSEC is something that you could see being in the area of responsibility of either of those groups, depending upon whether the company/organization views it as primarily a DNS issue or a security issue.

There were a number of other interesting charts as well as a section at the end with the demographics behind the survey.

With any survey like this, you do have to consider the source and BT Diamond IP is a vendor of products related to DNS, DNSSEC and IPAM.  Having said that, though, the results are in line with what we’ve seen in other surveys and are a welcome contribution to the ongoing discussion around DNSSEC deployment.  I’d love to see more of these type of surveys coming out with data from other demographics, regions, etc.

Thanks to BT Diamond IP for doing this research and also for making it publicly available without requiring a registration form for access.

 

Categories
Deploy360 IPv6

LAST DAY To Participate in 3rd Annual IPv6 Deployment Survey

NRO logoAs we’ve mentioned previously, today is the last day to let your voice be heard in the 3rd annual “IPv6 Deployment Monitoring Survey” on the current and future use of IPv6. The survey is at:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/GlobalIPv6survey2012

It will take just a few minutes and will go far in helping the the Number Resource Organization (NRO) (an umbrella organization for the 5 Regional Internet Registries) understand how the Internet community is moving toward widespread adoption of IPv6.

If you have IPv6 deployed in your network and can spare those few minutes, it will help all of us!

Thanks!

Categories
Deploy360 IPv6

Can You Help? 3rd Annual IPv6 Global Deployment Survey

NRO logoDo you have IPv6 deployed within your network? If so, could you please take a moment to participate in the 3rd annual “IPv6 Deployment Monitoring Survey” on the current and future use of IPv6?

The survey is at:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/GlobalIPv6survey2012

The survey won’t take that long and will go far in helping the the Number Resource Organization (NRO) (an umbrella organization for the 5 Regional Internet Registries) understand how the Internet community is moving toward widespread adoption of IPv6.  As the NRO states:

We encourage all organisations to participate in this survey, which we hope will establish a comprehensive view of present IPv6 penetration and future plans for IPv6 deployment. The survey is composed of 23 questions and can be completed in about 15 minutes. For those without IPv6 allocations or assignments, or who have not yet deployed IPv6, the questions will be fewer in number.

The results will be publicly available, as last year’s results are, and will be distributed widely.

Since the time we last wrote about the survey, THE DEADLINE WAS EXTENDED UNTIL FRIDAY, JULY 13th.

If you can spare the few minutes to answer the survey before next Friday it will greatly help the registries – and all of us – understand future trends for IPv6 deployment.  Thank you!

Categories
IPv6

Can You Help? 3rd Annual IPv6 Global Deployment Survey

NRO logoDo you have IPv6 deployed within your network? If so, could you please take a moment to participate in the 3rd annual “IPv6 Deployment Monitoring Survey” on the current and future use of IPv6?

The survey is at:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/GlobalIPv6survey2012

The survey won’t take that long and will go far in helping the the Number Resource Organization (NRO) (an umbrella organization for the 5 Regional Internet Registries) understand how the Internet community is moving toward widespread adoption of IPv6.  As the NRO states:

We encourage all organisations to participate in this survey, which we hope will establish a comprehensive view of present IPv6 penetration and future plans for IPv6 deployment. The survey is composed of 23 questions and can be completed in about 15 minutes. For those without IPv6 allocations or assignments, or who have not yet deployed IPv6, the questions will be fewer in number.

The results will be publicly available, as last year’s results are, and will be distributed widely.

Since the time we last wrote about the survey, THE DEADLINE WAS EXTENDED UNTIL FRIDAY, JULY 13th.

If you can spare the few minutes to answer the survey before next Friday it will greatly help the registries – and all of us – understand future trends for IPv6 deployment.  Thank you!