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Deploy360 IPv6

RIPE NCC Hackathon Version 6

The RIPE NCC will be holding its sixth Hackathon on 4-5 November 2017 in Copenhagen, Denmark, and by no coincidence at all, will be focusing on IPv6. This will be part of Danish IPv6 Week that’s being hosted by DKNOG and sponsored by Comcast Cable, and which will also have Deploy360 involvement in the shape of our colleague Jan Žorž.

Hackathons are opportunities for network operators, coders and hackers to get together to develop new tools, as well as exchange knowledge and experience with others. Some possible projects for this hackathon include improving IPv6 measurements such as IPv6 RIPEness, improving the IXP Country Jedi tool. that compares traceroutes between IPv4 and IPv6, and developing tools to advance IPv6 deployment.

The RIPE NCC are specifically looking for UX and UI experts including graphic designer, developers familiar with Python, Node.js, Perl and Go, Internet measurement researchers, and network and hosting operators who have experience of deploying IPv6.

If you’re interested in participating, then you need to apply before 10 October 2017.

Travel funding of EUR 500 per person is also available to six participants, with preference given to applicants from “least developed countries”, those working for not-for-profit organisations, and those with previous contributions to free and open-source software and projects. Please note though, the deadline for applicants who require require funding is 9 September 2017.

Further Information

Categories
Growing the Internet Technology

RIPE Atlas – What can it do for you?

http://dev.internetsociety.org/sites/default/files/styles/618width/public/blogs-media/probe-v3-new-logo.jpg?itok=frBNSuCY

Categories
Deploy360 IPv6

IPv6 reaches 10,000 ISPs in Europe and northern Asia

RIPE_NCC_Logo2015It’s worth pointing out the announcement from the RIPE NCC last week, that they reached the milestone of 10,000 Local Internet Registries (LIRs) having receiving IPv6 addresses. This leaves around 3,000 LIRs that still only have IPv4 addresses, although the uptake of IPv6 addresses has increased substantially since mid-2012.

In the way RIPE NCC is structured, the “LIRs” are the members of the RIPE NCC who receive blocks of IP addresses (both IPv4 and IPv6) and then distribute the IP addresses out to local organizations.  Typically these are Internet Service Providers (ISPs) or “network operators” who then provide Internet connections (and IP address blocks) to companies and organizations.  (Read more about LIRs on the RIPE NCC’s site.)  RIPE NCC is the Regional Internet Registry (RIR) for Europe and northern / western Asia.

The RIPE NCC started distributing IPv6 addresses in 1999, although uptake was initially slow as LIRs were required make a certain number of assignments to end sites until 2007. Provider Independent IPv6 addresses (i.e. those distributed directly to an end user organisation) were also not assigned until 2009 due to concerns over the (potential) growth of the global routing table, but once these policies changed there was a noticeable increase in IPv6 allocation requests.

In 2012 it became mandatory to have IPv6 resources in order to receive a /22 IPv4 address block which was responsible for the upsurge in LIR uptake. Interestingly though, since this policy was revoked in 2015 because it was felt that LIRs should not be forced to request ‘unneeded’ resources, IPv6 address distribution has remained around the same rate which indicates that LIRs are seeing a need for IPv6 address space.

Current policies make it easy to request IPv6 addresses so this is no obstacle to IPv6 deployment in your organisation. If you’re interested, then please see our Start Here page for more information!

Categories
IPv6

IPv6 reaches 10,000 ISPs in Europe and northern Asia

RIPE_NCC_Logo2015It’s worth pointing out the announcement from the RIPE NCC last week, that they reached the milestone of 10,000 Local Internet Registries (LIRs) having receiving IPv6 addresses. This leaves around 3,000 LIRs that still only have IPv4 addresses, although the uptake of IPv6 addresses has increased substantially since mid-2012.

In the way RIPE NCC is structured, the “LIRs” are the members of the RIPE NCC who receive blocks of IP addresses (both IPv4 and IPv6) and then distribute the IP addresses out to local organizations.  Typically these are Internet Service Providers (ISPs) or “network operators” who then provide Internet connections (and IP address blocks) to companies and organizations.  (Read more about LIRs on the RIPE NCC’s site.)  RIPE NCC is the Regional Internet Registry (RIR) for Europe and northern / western Asia.

The RIPE NCC started distributing IPv6 addresses in 1999, although uptake was initially slow as LIRs were required make a certain number of assignments to end sites until 2007. Provider Independent IPv6 addresses (i.e. those distributed directly to an end user organisation) were also not assigned until 2009 due to concerns over the (potential) growth of the global routing table, but once these policies changed there was a noticeable increase in IPv6 allocation requests.

In 2012 it became mandatory to have IPv6 resources in order to receive a /22 IPv4 address block which was responsible for the upsurge in LIR uptake. Interestingly though, since this policy was revoked in 2015 because it was felt that LIRs should not be forced to request ‘unneeded’ resources, IPv6 address distribution has remained around the same rate which indicates that LIRs are seeing a need for IPv6 address space.

Current policies make it easy to request IPv6 addresses so this is no obstacle to IPv6 deployment in your organisation. If you’re interested, then please see our Start Here page for more information!

Categories
Technology

Remembering Rob Blokzijl

On December 1, 2015, Rob Blokzijl passed away.

Rob Blokzijl started his career as a nuclear physicist, where he catalyzed the collaborations needed for building the networks that served scientific data exchange. Armed with that experience he became a founding member of the RIPE forum in 1989. He would be its chair, its primus inter pares, for 25 years to come. He was at the cradle of numerous initiatives that shaped the Internet, such as the creation of the first regional Internet registry in the world (RIPE NCC). He was one of the key persons for the European Internet and was involved in AMS-IX, in NATO, in ICANN, and various boards and committees. This year he was awarded the Postel Service Award for his pioneering work, 25 years of RIPE leadership, and for enabling countless others to spread the Internet across Europe and beyond.

There is a lot that can be read about Rob’s professional career on the Internet. So a more personal note on how I got to know him.

Rob Blokzijl was a leader – one that listened, absorbed, and then spoke. Never a word too much, always with the strength of logic and argument, often with small sprinkle of irony, but always with common sense.

He was a leader whose common sense was supported by being well documented. I remember that in discussions he often knew more about a document’s contents than its author did. He would share his vision and knowledge, proactively when needed. One could say that Rob was both principled and pragmatic. He held firm beliefs of the Internet that have inspired me, and many others. Rob was always available for a ‘second opinion’ and would provide advice that could be trusted. I regret the times I ignored it.

When Rob was awarded the Jonathan B. Postel Service Award this year, I asked if I could play a role in the ceremony. I did that because the awardee is what I imagine Jon Postel had been: A man with a vision about the Internet who inspired others through his competence, common sense, and personality. Rob was an important mentor throughout my career in the Internet and I was proud and happy that it was possible to pay him respect publicly by handing him the Postel Service Award.

Thanks, Rob.

Our colleagues at RIPE NCC have set up a memorial website at: https://www.ripe.net/participate/ripe/rob-blokzijl-obituary

Categories
Deploy360 IPv6 To archive

RIPE Labs Reports on IPv6 Readiness of Today’s Networks

To what degree are network operators engaging with IPv6? How ready are they to deploy IPv6? Those were the questions RIPE Labs’ Antony Gollan took on in his post today on the RIPE Labs blog in celebration of the 1 year anniversary of World IPv6 Launch. The RIPE NCC, the regional Internet registry (RIR) for the European region, uses a measure they call “RIPEness” to rate the IPv6 readiness of their members (who RIPE refers to as “Local Internet Registries” or “LIRs”). As he shows in the chart, the situation has improved in the past year:

ipv6-ripeness

He also touches on an effort to create a “fifth star” of IPv6 RIPEness that would measure whether LIRs are providing content over IPv6 and providing IPv6 access to end users. He also goes on to talk about their measurements showing the percentage of networks announcing IPv6 prefixes into the global routing system – and provides an excellent chart showing the growth (you’ll need to read the post to see it).

It’s great to see these measurements and statistics from RIPE NCC that coincide so well with the information we’re seeing out of other IPv6 statistics sites, including the World IPv6 Launch measurements.