Categories
Deploy360 IPv6

Facebook, Akamai Pass Major Milestone: Over 50% IPv6 from US mobile networks

Wednesday was a major milestone for Facebook. For the first time, more people connected over IPv6 than IPv4 from the four major US mobile networks! Facebook’s Paul Saab wrote about this on (where else?) Facebook:

facebook-ipv6-50percent-mobilenetworks

His text:

Today marks the first day that more people used IPv6 to access Facebook than IPv4 from the 4 major USA mobile networks. This is a huge milestone in just 4 short years since World IPv6 Launch in 2012.

Similarly, Erik Nygren at Akamai updated an earlier post last week with a similar view:

As an update as of August 10th, there has been significant growth over the past three months and deployment has crossed a major milestone: over half of requests to dual-stacked sites on Akamai from the top-4 US mobile networks now use IPv6! IPv6 is used around 70% of the time for Android and over 30% of the time for iPhones, up 10% each from May. We have also seen T-Mobile start to deploy IPv6 to iOS devices as well in a dual-stacked configuration.

Today over on the World IPv6 Launch blog, Mat Ford wrote that he is seeing this same milestone in the World IPv6 Launch measurements. The four major US mobile networks of Verizon Wireless, T-Mobile USA, Sprint Wireless and AT&T are seeing a combined measurement of close to 55% IPv6.  His chart:

World IPv6 Launch statistics

All of this shows the very real progress being made in IPv6 deployment.  If you have not started your plans to make your networks, applications and services available over IPv6, what are you waiting for?

To get started, please visit our Start Here page to find resources to help!

Categories
IPv6

Facebook, Akamai Pass Major Milestone: Over 50% IPv6 from US mobile networks

Wednesday was a major milestone for Facebook. For the first time, more people connected over IPv6 than IPv4 from the four major US mobile networks! Facebook’s Paul Saab wrote about this on (where else?) Facebook:

facebook-ipv6-50percent-mobilenetworks

His text:

Today marks the first day that more people used IPv6 to access Facebook than IPv4 from the 4 major USA mobile networks. This is a huge milestone in just 4 short years since World IPv6 Launch in 2012.

Similarly, Erik Nygren at Akamai updated an earlier post last week with a similar view:

As an update as of August 10th, there has been significant growth over the past three months and deployment has crossed a major milestone: over half of requests to dual-stacked sites on Akamai from the top-4 US mobile networks now use IPv6! IPv6 is used around 70% of the time for Android and over 30% of the time for iPhones, up 10% each from May. We have also seen T-Mobile start to deploy IPv6 to iOS devices as well in a dual-stacked configuration.

Today over on the World IPv6 Launch blog, Mat Ford wrote that he is seeing this same milestone in the World IPv6 Launch measurements. The four major US mobile networks of Verizon Wireless, T-Mobile USA, Sprint Wireless and AT&T are seeing a combined measurement of close to 55% IPv6.  His chart:

World IPv6 Launch statistics

All of this shows the very real progress being made in IPv6 deployment.  If you have not started your plans to make your networks, applications and services available over IPv6, what are you waiting for?

To get started, please visit our Start Here page to find resources to help!

Categories
Growing the Internet

An Accessible Internet

There is no conclusive data globally, but most studies seem to indicate that around 20% of the population has some sort of disability. While this does not always translate to the person not being able to use the Internet, there still is a significant percentage that is not able to – particularly if they are visually or physically challenged.

Web content accessibility guidelines (WCAG) have been around for a while, and over the years they have been continually updated and developed to try and provide a better user experience. While some websites have adopted these – to varying degrees – a large proportion have not.

Keeping in mind that Internet users with accessibility needs are a significant part of the population, this does mean that many of them are not able to make full use of the content available. For businesses this translates to lost opportunities – if a user is not able to view the content, then they are also not going to buy a product or service made available through the site.

This also applies to non-commercial websites – be they run by the government or others. With more and more governments embracing e-government services, it is critical that these services meet accessibility guidelines so that all parts of the population are able to make full use of these services.

Recently, I was in Pakistan where I met with the ICT Accessibility Working Group and the Ministry of Information Technology. It was very encouraging to note that at the meeting, the Ministry made a commitment to ensure that its own website met accessibility guidelines and immediately put in place a team to work with members of the ICT Accessibility Working Group. In just over a week, the team was able to meet all the requirements for web accessibility under the WCAG. Moreover, the Ministry made a further commitment to encourage other parts of government to do the same. Estimates indicate around 10% of Pakistan’s population has accessibility needs, so this is a great step forward.

Last year we partnered with the Pakistan Telecommunication Authority to launch a mobile app development competition to encourage local mobile content and services development in the country. This year, a strategic decision was made to focus the 2016 Mobile App Awards on accessibility issues for People with Disabilities with the theme “Embracing Mobile Accessibility”.

This is another small way to not only raise awareness of accessibility issues but also encourage developers and the technical community to be inclusive from the very beginning when designing and launching products and services – and in this way universal design becomes inherent.

Categories
Building Trust Growing the Internet Improving Technical Security Privacy Women in Tech

Converging on Barcelona for MWC 2016

Our President & CEO, Kathy Brown, will again lead a group of us headed to GSMA’s Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, the week of 22 February. As highlighted in our 2016 Action Plan, our focus this year is on connecting everyone who is unconnected, and promoting trust in the Internet. Both topics are highlighted in last year’s Internet Society Global Internet Report, as critical issues with respect to the mobile Internet. With its concentration of Ministers, CEOs, operators and vendors, from around the world, Barcelona is the place to be to build the visibility, reach, and influence of the Internet Society for these key topics.

When it comes to increasing access, according to the most recent ITU numbers, there are 3.2 billion Internet users worldwide, or 44% of the population. Of these users, more than 80% access the Internet over mobile devices. Looking forward, the mobile Internet will clearly drive growth in usage; already, 78% of the population can receive mobile broadband signals, leaving significant room to grow just with existing infrastructure, which itself is always growing. Remaining obstacles include affordability of services and handsets for those who can’t afford service, and increasing the amount of relevant local content to attract those non-users who can afford service.

While we attend sessions and meetings to discuss all these aspects of increased access, we will have the opportunity to focus in particular on inclusion, but also on the need to recognize how women are empowering themselves through the Internet. According to a recent Web Foundation survey in nine cities in the developing world, women are 50% less likely than men to use the Internet, denying them the opportunity for increased economic, social, and government inclusion. But once women and girls have access to the Internet, they are more likely to use it in their daily lives. For example, 60% of bloggers online are women who also represent close to half of social media users. Kathy will have the opportunity to address these issues in her keynote interview and panel as part of the “Women Leadership Accelerating the Digital Age” session on Thursday, 25 February.

In addition to increasing the number of Internet users, we want to ensure that new and existing users alike have trust in using the Internet. In this, the mobile ecosystem plays a critical role. Not just because of the extent of mobile usage, but also because of its nature. To access a traditional computer the hacker must come in proximity to the computer at home or in the office; with a mobile device such as a smartphone, users bring the device into proximity of the hackers. A lost or stolen device can be read; wireless signals can be intercepted; and mobile apps can contain malware. As we use our devices increasingly to make payments, track our health, and conduct our business, these risks magnify.

The mobile industry has led to previously unimaginable levels of connectivity. 95% of the global population can receive a mobile voice signal, with 7 billion subscriptions used by more than half the world’s population. We know that this role will be duplicated in connecting the unconnected. We also seek to encourage the entire mobile ecosystem to join the Internet community to help build trust as well as connectivity.

Much of the future of the Internet is on display in Barcelona – the new devices and service providers who will connect the unconnected and the connected things that are beginning to surround us in smart homes, smart cars, and smart cities.

We can think of no better place to be to raise awareness of the Internet Society’s principles and values across the entire mobile ecosystem, and look forward to an exciting and fruitful visit.


NOTE: During the MWC 2016 show, you can monitor our activities via:

You can also follow the #MWC2016 hashtag on Twitter, Facebook and most other social networks.

Categories
Internet Governance

First Internet Society Discussion Paper on The Mobile App Divide

I am pleased to announce the creation of an Internet Society Discussion Paper Series, and to release its first paper, “ The Mobile App Divide. The Internet Society Discussion Paper Series is intended, as the name suggests, to stimulate discussion around a topical issue of importance to meeting the Internet Society goals. In style, it is intended to be longer than a blog post and shorter than a full research study, and likewise, in substance it represents our emerging opinion, but does not represent a final Internet Society position. Instead, we intend it as a means to gather information and insight from our community on the topic. The discussion will inform our view on the issue, and will be reflected in a revised version of the paper.

Our vision that the Internet is for Everyone is driven by the opportunity that the Internet provides for all of its users, including economic benefits. An important economic benefit is the opportunity provided to entrepreneurs to use the Internet to help create and sell their innovations. Access to the open Internet not only allows entrepreneurs to turn their inspiration into innovation, and their innovation into income, but the results often target unfulfilled gaps in developers’ own environment, generating the local content that will increase interest and usage of the Internet.

Mobile apps, which run on smart devices, represent in many ways the ideal online opportunity for entrepreneurs – once an app is created, the developer has only to upload it to an app store which can fulfill the entire rest of the value chain: storage, discovery, distribution, delivery, and updates of the apps, and payments when relevant. App sales are easier than more traditional online sales that require the development of a website, a payment mechanism, and distribution, not to mention the sale of physical goods that additionally require shipment and the corresponding international customs issues.

The first mobile app store was introduced by Apple just seven years ago, and already apps are the main way that many interact with the Internet, using a wide variety of smart devices including phones and tablets. This popularity has generated an app economy worth multi billions of dollars, generating welcome jobs and earnings. However, the opportunity is not available to all.

In developed countries, users have a choice of more than a million apps, across multiple platforms, which have been downloaded well over one hundred billion times. On their side, app developers have access to a market of well over a billion users, and have earned billions in revenue from paid downloads, in-app purchases, and advertising.

In contrast, in Sub-Saharan Africa, in only exactly one country – Nigeria – do users and developers have the same opportunities as in the developed countries to create and use free and paid apps with the largest app platform, Google Play. In many of the countries, developers can only make free apps available – not paid apps. In the other countries, developers cannot even make free apps available. By the same token, in some countries users can only download free apps – in others it is not clear that they have access to any apps through the main app stores.

Overall, this leaves a picture of a significant lost opportunity: on the one hand, the apps that many use every day are not available to all; on the other hand, the marketplace for developers to earn their living is also not available. As we focus on closing the digital divide for access, it is important to also close this app divide to ensure that everyone has the opportunity to benefit from the growing app economy.

In the paper we highlight alternative ways that developers may generate revenues in the majority of countries where they cannot sell apps, and the way these alternatives fall short of full access to the app opportunities available elsewhere. Notably, the app divide highlights a general issue with international payments to and from developing countries, that restricts the ability to use other innovative online inputs important to entrepreneurs, including PayPal, for general e-commerce, and Kickstarter, for crowd-funding new innovations.

The reasons behind this lack of international payments are complicated, opaque, and not consistent from country to country, which are reflected in a difficulty in providing specific recommendations. Instead, this paper is intended to highlight the issue and generate a needed discussion about cause, effect, and solution, in order to ensure the economic opportunity of the Internet is fully available to all of its current and future users.

Please read ” The Mobile App Divide” and then join us in our Connect Open Forum or leave a comment on this blog post to provide your views and opinions on this topic.


Image credit: Ken Banks, kiwanja.net

Categories
Open Internet Standards

The Mobile App Trap

The Apple App Store is seven years old as of Friday, 10 July, marking a key – and possibly critical – evolution in how we use the Internet. First, the numbers, which are truly astounding – there are now more than 1.4 million apps available, which have been downloaded more than 100 billion times. And that’s just Apple. Add in Android and the other platforms, and we start talking about a new app economy, generating billions in revenues for developers from around the world.

For us, the users, apps are our current path to the increasing number of features in our smart phones and tablets, helping us from morning until night. Apps can help wake us in the morning based on our sleep cycle, pay for our coffee, navigate our way to a meeting, time our exercise, remind us to pick up some bread, and find a constellation in the night sky. Based on one survey in the US, more than 80% of online time on a mobile is spent on apps, as opposed to a browser. Even adding in desktop browsing, these users spend more than 50% of overall online time using mobile apps.

That’s a big shift in how we use the Internet. It has generated significant benefits, but they come at a cost. Contemplate the time and expense that might be required to switch mobile platforms. Every app must be downloaded on the new platform, and some must be paid for, again. That assumes that all apps are available on every platform, which they are not. Developers face an expense customizing their apps for each platform, and many only target one or two.

This can, in turn, limit competition between platforms. A new platform needs to offer apps to attract users, but users look at the number of apps available before choosing a platform. In economics we call this a two-sided market – but everyone else calls it a chicken-and-egg problem.

This phenomenon is new to the Internet, where switching computers simply required installing a new or familiar browser, and then possibly redoing favorite bookmarks. It turns out, however, that the old way could also be the new way, using web apps.

A web app enables developers to create websites with advanced features that can be installed on a mobile device with an icon similar to existing apps. Developers can create one web app for all platforms – consumers can easily move between platforms the way they switch browsers today – and new platforms can enter and compete on more of an even ground.

The work leading to this new app environment, known as the Open Web Platform, is led by the World Wide Web Consortium. Examples of this new platform are already emerging and could be a new milestone in how we use the mobile Internet.

The development of web apps, and their resulting ‘interoperability’, has a corollary to a key feature of the Internet as a whole. During the early years of the Internet’s commercialization, vendors and operators joined the open standards movement and helped unleash an unprecedented era of growth and innovation. They found value in adopting standards that promoted interoperability between products across the industry.

Providing interoperability with web apps would reduce the development cost of apps that could reach all platforms, and thereby help to preserve the permissionless innovation that has been a hallmark of the Internet since its creation. It enables anyone, be they in Silicon Valley or Swaziland, to turn inspiration into innovation and innovation into income in order succeed in the new Internet-enabled global marketplace. This would mark another important milestone in the development and evolution of the mobile Internet.

To find out more, read the 2015 Global Internet Report: http://dev.internetsociety.org/globalinternetreport/

Categories
Encryption Improving Technical Security IPv6 Mutually Agreed Norms for Routing Security (MANRS) Open Internet Standards

Talking Encryption, Routing Security, IPv6, and More at Mobile World Congress

Photo: android – google space CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

Next week I’ll be at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Spain, talking about pervasive monitoring and additional Internet encryption, increasing routing security and resilience through the MANRS initiative, and growing IPv6 deployments in mobile operator networks. I encourage you to also read my colleague’s blog post yesterday about Kathy Brown’s keynote on the Economics of Internet Governance and Michael Kende’s panel on the regulatory enablers and obstacles to innovation of and for the mobile Internet. For today, though, I’ll focus on our technology messages.

This is a HUGE trade show for the mobile world, and it’s a great opportunity to talk to mobile operators, network equipment vendors, analysts, and others about the technology issues at the intersection of mobile networks and the Internet.

Pervasive monitoring remains a serious threat to every user of the Internet. The Internet technical community is increasing efforts to make all Internet communications more private and more secure. We support those efforts strongly and will be speaking to network operators about the practical issues of getting from where we are today to a more secure and private future.

Working collaboratively to ensure a more secure and stable routing infrastructure is also an important goal for us. To that end, I plan to speak to network operators about signing on to support the actions outlined in the Mutually Agreed Norms for Routing Security, or “MANRS” document, contained within the Routing Resilience Manifesto initiative. The more network operators who agree to the practices outlined in that initiative and who publicly declare that they support such practices, the more likely we will see a truly stable and secure network.

Finally, IPv6 deployment has been growing steadily for the past several years. There are significant mobile deployments at Verizon Wireless and T-Mobile USA in the United States, and other smaller scale deployments in mobile networks around the globe, but there is much work to be done. We would like to encourage more IPv6 uptake in mobile networks and plan to speak to operators about impediments to that progress. (As always, our Deploy360 Programme is poised to help operators get started.)

If you’re planning to attend Mobile World Congress and would like to discuss any of these issues, please drop me a note in the comments here or via our social media channels – Twitter, Facebook, or Google+. My colleague Phil Roberts and I would love to spend some time speaking with you in Barcelona.

Categories
Deploy360 IPv6

Facebook's iOS Apps Now Work On IPv6-Only Networks

Facebook iOS app iconsFacebook continues to demonstrate their commitment to making sure that people can access Facebook from whatever networks they may be on – and particularly new IPv6-based networks. Not only is Facebook moving to an IPv6-only internal network, but now comes word that their iOS mobile applications, both the regular Facebook app and also the Facebook Messenger app, can work perfectly fine on an IPv6-only network.

The information was relayed by Facebook’s Paul Saab in, of course, the IPv6 Group on Facebook. Back on December 2, Paul wrote:

The most recent release of the Facebook iOS app works on IPv6-only networks. The interesting thing in making this all work, is the example Reachability code that apple released really only showed how to implement it for IPv4 or hostnames, but using a hostname was broken if you were on an IPv4 only network and the hostname was dual stacked. Anyway, the main app is now fixed and our Messenger application will be updated soon to also have the fix.

And late last night he posted:

The FB Messenger was released and now supports IPv6-only networks

As the discussion thread indicates, the Android versions of the two apps should also work on IPv6-only networks but there are currently issues with Android devices in general working on IPv6-only networks.

The key point here is that as some network operators are now deploying IPv6-only networks because of a lack of IPv4 addresses. Consider the case of T-Mobile USA.  Facebook’s applications will work fine and give the best possible user experience on those IPv6-only networks.  Some of these new IPv6-only networks, such as those in the mobile space, use technologies such as 464XLAT to enable IPv4-only applications to still work.  BUT… any such translation technologies do add complexity and introduce some degree of latency (which might be quite tiny, but still there).

Facebook is avoiding all of that by making sure that their mobile applications work well in IPv6-only networks.

Those apps will work over native IPv6 networks to connect back to Facebook’s IPv6 data centers.  Without needing to pass through some IPv4 gateway or translation tool, the apps should provide the fastest and simplest connections – which means a better experience for users.

Now, the Facebook applications also work fine in a “dual-stack” mixed IPv6/IPv4 network.  They have for quite a long time now. But Facebook has now tested these apps on networks without IPv4 – and that is a difference.

Congratulations to Paul Saab and the rest of the team there at Facebook for taking this step – and we hope that other mobile application developers will see this and consider testing their applications on IPv6-only networks as well.

As we run out of IPv4 addresses and have to look at IPv6-only networks with some kind of IPv4 translation on the edge…   the best possible user experience is going to be with those applications and services that can avoid all of the IPv4 translation and work completely over IPv6.

P.S. If you would like to get started with moving your application or service to IPv6, please visit our Start Here page for pointers on how to begin!

 

Categories
IPv6

Facebook's iOS Apps Now Work On IPv6-Only Networks

Facebook iOS app iconsFacebook continues to demonstrate their commitment to making sure that people can access Facebook from whatever networks they may be on – and particularly new IPv6-based networks. Not only is Facebook moving to an IPv6-only internal network, but now comes word that their iOS mobile applications, both the regular Facebook app and also the Facebook Messenger app, can work perfectly fine on an IPv6-only network.

The information was relayed by Facebook’s Paul Saab in, of course, the IPv6 Group on Facebook. Back on December 2, Paul wrote:

The most recent release of the Facebook iOS app works on IPv6-only networks. The interesting thing in making this all work, is the example Reachability code that apple released really only showed how to implement it for IPv4 or hostnames, but using a hostname was broken if you were on an IPv4 only network and the hostname was dual stacked. Anyway, the main app is now fixed and our Messenger application will be updated soon to also have the fix.

And late last night he posted:

The FB Messenger was released and now supports IPv6-only networks

As the discussion thread indicates, the Android versions of the two apps should also work on IPv6-only networks but there are currently issues with Android devices in general working on IPv6-only networks.

The key point here is that as some network operators are now deploying IPv6-only networks because of a lack of IPv4 addresses. Consider the case of T-Mobile USA.  Facebook’s applications will work fine and give the best possible user experience on those IPv6-only networks.  Some of these new IPv6-only networks, such as those in the mobile space, use technologies such as 464XLAT to enable IPv4-only applications to still work.  BUT… any such translation technologies do add complexity and introduce some degree of latency (which might be quite tiny, but still there).

Facebook is avoiding all of that by making sure that their mobile applications work well in IPv6-only networks.

Those apps will work over native IPv6 networks to connect back to Facebook’s IPv6 data centers.  Without needing to pass through some IPv4 gateway or translation tool, the apps should provide the fastest and simplest connections – which means a better experience for users.

Now, the Facebook applications also work fine in a “dual-stack” mixed IPv6/IPv4 network.  They have for quite a long time now. But Facebook has now tested these apps on networks without IPv4 – and that is a difference.

Congratulations to Paul Saab and the rest of the team there at Facebook for taking this step – and we hope that other mobile application developers will see this and consider testing their applications on IPv6-only networks as well.

As we run out of IPv4 addresses and have to look at IPv6-only networks with some kind of IPv4 translation on the edge…   the best possible user experience is going to be with those applications and services that can avoid all of the IPv4 translation and work completely over IPv6.

P.S. If you would like to get started with moving your application or service to IPv6, please visit our Start Here page for pointers on how to begin!

 

Categories
Growing the Internet

Zero rating: enabling or restricting Internet access?

Broadband access policies have in recent years occupied a prime spot in digital divide discussions. But at the recently held Internet Governance Forum (IGF) in Istanbul, an increasingly common but oft-overlooked aspect of the debate has bubbled up the surface: zero-rating. The practice involves mobile carriers, through a prior agreement with specific content providers, offering free mobile data to allow customers to access particular online content or services at no additional cost.

The scheme, which has seen growing uptake in emerging Internet markets like India, Indonesia and the Philippines, remains highly controversial, not least because it challenges the core tenets of Net Neutrality. Those who are against it argue that zero-rating, by granting free access to some websites but charging for others, entails preferential treatment of certain sources of content. If normalised, they fear that it would prompt carriers to launch similar discriminatory deals on the premise of getting more people online. That the most prevalent zero-rated programmes involve giant US-based providers such as Facebook, Google and Twitter, makes it more contentious as it could also pose a threat to local content development.

Proponents contend that zero-rating is a competitive tool for introducing both Internet access and relevant online content to low-income communities. By spurring increased demand for Internet connectivity, it could also help carriers achieve the scale they need to invest in better networks, potentially allowing them to provide Internet access at a lower price. New industry studies appear to substantiate some of these claims, but the correlation between increased mobile data subscription and zero-rated programmes have yet to be fully quantified.

There is equally a lack of concrete data to support counterclaims that such schemes might prompt users to drop their data plans and use zero-rating as a substitute for Internet access. But such risks may be slim as it is in carriers’ interest, if they are to convert people to full data subscribers, to offer these only for a fixed period. Indeed, keeping these temporary would help to assuage fears that the service is discouraging Internet users from realising the full value of the Internet.

Mobile carriers gravitate towards big content providers because they already have a huge following, which through network effect makes them more attractive to potential subscribers. However, it just as crucial to ensure that small and medium providers, especially those that produce and distribute local content, get the same opportunity to sign up to these agreements.

The industry can take a leaf out of Wikimedia’s book. The foundation, whose own programme, Wikipedia Zero, has enjoyed success in countries like Nepal, allows other public interest websites to ride onto its own scheme, eschews any exclusive rights or exchange of payment between itself and mobile carriers, and forbids carriers from selling the service as part of a limited bundle.  Wikimedia has in the past stressed the importance of keeping zero-rated platforms open to enable users to appropriate them for their own needs, perhaps even using them in ways for which they may not have been originally intended.

It remains to be seen how zero-rated programmes, should this be a widely accepted route for gaining first time access to the Internet, would affect the online habits and preferences of the next one or two billion people to go online.  It is worth noting however, that zero-rating is not a panacea for the biggest remaining obstacles to connectivity: from high costs of access and slow connection speeds, perhaps from lack of competition across the Internet value chain, to poor infrastructure investment in non-commercially viable areas. These can only solved by taking steps, whether through technical means or well-rounded policies, to improve the conditions that have kept the Internet out of reach for many people.

Categories
Deploy360 IPv6

China Telecom Completes IPv6 Test On 4G LTE Network

IPv6 BadgeBy way of a news release from ZTE Corporation we were pleased to read about China Telecom’s recent successful testing of IPv6 capabilities on its 4G/LTE network in the Hunan province of China.  Given that LTE has been a huge area of growth for IPv6 globally, such as the recent measurement of Verizon Wireless’ network as having over 50% IPv6 deployment, we certainly see LTE as one of the first ways that many people will receive IPv6 in a mobile environment.

Given that ZTE Corporation is a equipment vendor their news release naturally explains how they helped China Telecom, but overlooking the marketing for a moment there are some useful data points in the news release:

The comprehensive weeklong test involved trial users and covered IPv4/IPv6 single- and dual-stack services, billing systems and backend IT infrastructure systems, demonstrating China Telecom’s 4G LTE network to be IPv6-ready.

As China Telecom rolls out 4G LTE services nationwide, IPv6 will help the operator manage the anticipated explosion in demand for new IP addresses. Becoming IPv6-ready is a key part of China Telecom’s plans for wider 4G LTE network deployments.

This successful IPv6 test fully verified the IPv6/IPv4 dual-stack capabilities of China Telecom’s 4G LTE network in Hunan, laying a solid foundation for the operator’s plans for wider deployment of 4G and other next-generation services in the future.

All great to see.  Beyond a “test”, of course, we look forward to seeing the full deployment of IPv6 across China Telecom’s 4G LTE network!


Are you looking to get started with deploying IPv6?  Or just simply understanding more about IPv6?  Please see our “Start Here” page to find resources focused on your type of organization – and please let us know if you need even more information.

Categories
IPv6

China Telecom Completes IPv6 Test On 4G LTE Network

IPv6 BadgeBy way of a news release from ZTE Corporation we were pleased to read about China Telecom’s recent successful testing of IPv6 capabilities on its 4G/LTE network in the Hunan province of China.  Given that LTE has been a huge area of growth for IPv6 globally, such as the recent measurement of Verizon Wireless’ network as having over 50% IPv6 deployment, we certainly see LTE as one of the first ways that many people will receive IPv6 in a mobile environment.

Given that ZTE Corporation is a equipment vendor their news release naturally explains how they helped China Telecom, but overlooking the marketing for a moment there are some useful data points in the news release:

The comprehensive weeklong test involved trial users and covered IPv4/IPv6 single- and dual-stack services, billing systems and backend IT infrastructure systems, demonstrating China Telecom’s 4G LTE network to be IPv6-ready.

<snip>

As China Telecom rolls out 4G LTE services nationwide, IPv6 will help the operator manage the anticipated explosion in demand for new IP addresses. Becoming IPv6-ready is a key part of China Telecom’s plans for wider 4G LTE network deployments.

<snip>

This successful IPv6 test fully verified the IPv6/IPv4 dual-stack capabilities of China Telecom’s 4G LTE network in Hunan, laying a solid foundation for the operator’s plans for wider deployment of 4G and other next-generation services in the future.

All great to see.  Beyond a “test”, of course, we look forward to seeing the full deployment of IPv6 across China Telecom’s 4G LTE network!


Are you looking to get started with deploying IPv6?  Or just simply understanding more about IPv6?  Please see our “Start Here” page to find resources focused on your type of organization – and please let us know if you need even more information.