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IETF

IETF 101, Day 4: The Brass Tacks about DNS and Routing

This week is IETF 101 in London, and we’re bringing you daily blog posts highlighting the topics of interest to us in the ISOC Internet Technology Team. And Thursday is probably the busiest day for us, covering the whole range of our interests.

ROLL has its first of two sessions starting at 09.30 GMT/UTC; continuing on Friday morning. There are several drafts being discussed dealing with the issues of routing over resource constrained networks where limited updates are possible.


NOTE: If you are unable to attend IETF 101 in person, there are multiple ways to participate remotely.


There’s a choice between a couple of working groups after lunch, starting at 13.30 GMT/UTC.

DOH was chartered to create a single RFC, so clearly the draft DNS queries over HTTPS is going to be the primary focus of discussion. However, there will also be updates on the practical implementation work, and a discussion about possible future work if there is a decision to re-charter the group.

6LO runs in parallel and has a fairly busy agenda with Registration Extensions for 6LoWPAN Neighbor Discovery, and Address Protected Neighbor Discovery for Low-power and Lossy Networks having received feedback from the IESG. The drafts related to IPv6 Backbone Router and Packet Delivery Deadline time in 6LoWPAN Routing Header are being prepared for Working Group Last Calls, and there will also be updates on the 6LO applicability and use cases and from the fragmentation design team (draft-watteyne-6lo-minimal-fragment-00 and draft-thubert-6lo-forwarding-fragments-04). Finally, there’s a proposed update to RFCs 6550 and 6775 where 6LoWPAN ND nodes in a RPL domain do not participate in the routing protocol.

Following the afternoon break there’s the choice of SIDROPS, T2TRG or a joint NTP/TICTOC meeting, commencing at 15.50 GMT/UTC.

SIDROPS will be discussing several drafts related to the operational management of certificates in the RPKI, and in particular how to perform RPKI checks via a route server. There are also two drafts related to Trust Anchor Locators – one defining a TAL for RPKI with support for HTTPS URIs, whilst RPKI signed object for TAL defines how a RPKI signed object can be used to communicate a new Trust Anchor Locator to already deployed Relying Parties. There’s a working group sponsored draft on Requirements for RPKI Relying Parties, and finally a new proposed draft on Origin Validation Policy Considerations for Dropping Invalid Routes (not yet published).

T2TRG researches the issues of turning the IoT into reality, and will be discussing a key draft State-of-the-Art and Challenges for the Internet of Things Security. There will also be presentations on Deep learning on microcontrollers, Secure Computations in Decentralized Environments, and Semantic Interoperability Testing.

The NTP/TICTOC joint session is focusing on Network Time Security (NTS). This represents a significant update for NTP server authentication as secure and accurate time synchronization is vitally important for the proper operation of security protocols.

If you still have any remaining energy, there’s a couple of evening sessions starting at 18.10 GMT/UTC.

DNSOP holds its second session of the week, and the main draft of interest is the Multi-Provider DNSSEC Model that relates to deploying DNSSEC in environments where multiple DNS providers are in use.

Last but not least, UTA will be discussing drafts on Strict Transport Security (STS) for mail (SMTP) transfer agents and mail user agents as well as SMTP Require TLS Option.

For more background, please read the Rough Guide to IETF 101 from Olaf, Dan, Andrei, Steve, Karen and myself.

Relevant Working Groups

Categories
Deploy360 Domain Name System Security Extensions (DNSSEC) IETF Improving Technical Security IPv6 Open Internet Standards

IETF 101, Day 2: A Bit of Rosie Lee (Mobility)

This week is IETF 101 in London, and we’re bringing you daily blog posts highlighting the topics of interest to us in the ISOC Internet Technology Team. After a hectic Monday there’s less dashing around needed today, although there’s a few things to highlight, even if you’ll have to choose between them as they’re unfortunately all scheduled at the same time.


NOTE: If you are unable to attend IETF 101 in person, there are multiple ways to participate remotely.


DNSOP starts its first of two sessions at 15.50 GMT/UTC (it continues on Thursday. Several of the drafts under discussion relate to the Root KSK Rollover and how to better automate and monitor key rollovers.

At the same time, DOTS is also meeting and has a bit of a mixed agenda with four drafts up for discussion, implementation reports, and feedback on the Hackathon.

There are two drafts covering the Distributed Denial-of-Service Open Threat Signaling (DOTS) Signal Channel and Data Channel specifications, one that establishes an architecture for establishing and maintaining signalling within and between domains, with the last one presenting use cases describing the interactions expected between DOTS components and messaging exchanges.

Alternatively, DMM has a very busy agenda with no less than thirteen drafts under discussion. A selection of these includes DMM deployment Models and Architectural Considerations, Proxy Mobile IPv6 extensions for Distributed Mobility ManagementSegment Routing IPv6 for Mobile User Plane, and Segment Routing IPv6 as Data Plane for 3GPP N9 Interface (still awaiting draft to be published). Worth highlighting too, is the draft on Optimized Mobile User Plane Solutions for 5G.

For more background, please read the Rough Guide to IETF 101 from Olaf, Dan, Andrei, Steve, Karen and myself.

Relevant Working Groups

Categories
Deploy360 Domain Name System Security Extensions (DNSSEC) IETF Improving Technical Security IPv6 Open Internet Standards

IETF 101, Jour 2: Un peu de Rosie Lee (Mobilité)

IETF 101 se déroule cette semaine à Londres. L’équipe de technologie Internet de l’ISOC vous apporte tous les jours des articles de blog mettant en évidence les sujets que nous jugeons intéressants.  Après un lundi mouvementé, il y a moins de choses à faire aujourd’hui, bien qu’il y ait quelques points à souligner, même si vous devez choisir entre eux car ils sont malheureusement tous programmés en même temps.


À savoir : Si vous ne pouvez pas être présent à l’IETF 101 en personne, il y a plusieurs façons de participer à distance.

Pour plus de détails cliquez ici

 

 

Categories
IETF

ISOC’s Hot Topics at IETF 101

Tomorrow begins IETF 101 in London, United Kingdom, and it’s the third time that an IETF has been held in the country. Following on the heels of our Rough Guide to IETF 101 where we go in-depth about specific topics of interest, the ISOC Internet Technology Team is again highlighting the latest IPv6, DNSSEC, Securing BGP, TLS and IoT related developments as the week progresses.

Below are the sessions that we’ll be following in the coming week. Note this post was written in advance so please check the official IETF 101 agenda for any updates, room changes, or final details.

Monday, 18 March 2018

Tuesday, 19 March 2018

Wednesday, 20 March 2018

Thursday, 21 March 2018

Friday, 22 March 2018

The IETF Hackathon will be held Saturday, 17 March 2018 (09.00-22.00 UTC) and Sunday, 18 March 2018 (09.00-16.00) in the Sovereign Room. The Hackathon provides an opportunity for developers and implementers to discuss ideas, solutions and code to develop practical implementations of IETF standards.

The IETF Code Sprint will also be held on Saturday, 18 March 2018 (09.30-17.30). The Code Sprint brings together volunteers from the IETF Community to work on code for the IETF Datatracker, mailing lists, and other tools used by the IETF community.

You can also read the Internet Society’s latest Rough Guide to IETF 101. In particular, see:

If you can’t get to London next week, you can attend remotely!  Just visit the IETF 101 remote participation page or check out http://www.ietf.org/live/ for more options.