Categories
Deploy360 IPv6

LinkedIn Passes Another IPv6 Milestone

Yesterday, LinkedIn announced that, “Earlier this month, and for the first time in our company’s history, more than 50% of pages on LinkedIn were accessed over IPv6 from mobile devices in the U.S.” This is great news and further proof that IPv6 is the new normal.

LinkedIn has been a trailblazer in IPv6 for many years, participating in World IPv6 Launch and regularly informing their community about the progress they’re making through the engineering blog. We’ve been writing about their efforts since 2014. Yesterday’s blog post from Franck Martin elaborates on LinkedIn’s history with IPv6 and its future plans, stating:

“Since we enabled IPv6 on our mail servers in 2013 and then on our web site in 2014, we have seen increased growth of our external IPv6 traffic. We are currently working on enabling IPv6 on our all of our internal networks and applications in order to begin removing IPv4 internally, beginning in 2018. The external network and public services will still support IPv4 (for compatibility with legacy clients) for years to come, but we anticipate the proportion of our external traffic served over IPv6 to only increase. The community has seen tangible benefits from serving content over IPv6 compared to IPv4. We, too, see some performance improvements on IPv6.”

This is another milestone in the road to full IPv6 deployment, and we applaud LinkedIn’s efforts to date.

Are you ready to get started? Deploy360 aims to help networks of all sizes on their path to IPv6 deployment, so please take a look at our Start Here page to learn more.

Categories
Deploy360 IPv6

IPv6 inside LinkedIn

There’s a series of interesting articles authored by Franck Martin and Tim Crofts about how LinkedIn has enabled IPv6 and the issues they’ve encountered. LinkedIn has been running IPv6 since 2014, but this year they decided to test what happens with an IPv6-only network instead of a dual-stack one.

The first article commissioned for the anniversary of World IPv6 Launch explains why LinkedIn decided to move their internal network over to IPv6.

In the second article, they describe the challenges of enabling dual stack in their data centres, and they went about configuring their systems to work with IPv6.

The latest article covers their progress towards an IPv6-only data centre, and the issues and challenges they’ve had with installing, configuring and managing servers and software tools in this environment. Although they’re not currently running an IPv6-only data centre, they are currently working towards the goal of removing IPv4 completely in order to simplify management of their systems and network.

More Information:

Well worth reading and more evidence of how major service providers are actively making the transition to IPv6.

Deploy360 also aims to help with this, so please take a look at our Start Here page to understand how you can get started with IPv6.

Categories
Deploy360 IPv6

LinkedIn Joins The World IPv6 Launch Measurements Project

LinkedIn logoWe were very pleased to read that LinkedIn is joining the WorldIPv6 Launch measurements effort and providing data about what it is seeing in the way of IPv6 deployment among the many visitors coming to LinkedIn’s sites.  In that post to the World IPv6 Launch blog, our colleague Mat Ford also pointed that the November 2014 IPv6 measurements are now out and show the continued growth of IPv6.

LinkedIn is no stranger to IPv6. You may recall the LinkedIn IPv6 case study we published earlier this year where they outlined their work on using IPv6 for SMTP.  I can also personally attest to the fact that when I connect to LinkedIn’s web site I can see via the IPvFoo plugin for Chrome that I’m connecting over IPv6.

Kudos to LinkedIn for stepping forward to help out with IPv6 measurements!  We look forward to seeing the continued growth of IPv6 as we have for the past months.

Categories
Deploy360 IPv6

Yea! LinkedIn Joins Facebook And Google In Permanently Enabling IPv6

We were delighted to read today that LinkedIn has now permanently enabled IPv6 for their website.  I proved it myself by visiting the LinkedIn site moments ago using a Google Chrome browser with the IPvFoo extension installed:

LinkedIn goes IPv6

As my colleague Phil Roberts writes on the Internet Technology Matters blog:

As they say, “The transition to IPv6 is invisible for our members.” So if you’re a member who has looked at your LinkedIn profile today, you did this over IPv6 and probably weren’t aware. I’m also encouraged that in their trial run before the full launch, they saw about 3% of their members using IPv6 to reach them.

Given that I have native IPv6 in my home office, presumably my connections to LinkedIn from my various devices will now start to all be over IPv6… which is excellent for the growth of the Internet!

Personally, given how much I do with social media, I’m pleased because this now means that with one exception the major social networks I use will all work over IPv6:

  • Facebook
  • Google … both for Google+ and for YouTube
  • LinkedIn

… which just leaves Twitter as the major social media laggard still stuck on legacy IPv4  (of the social networks I use).

When you consider that other major sites like Yahoo, Wikipedia, AOL, Netflix and thousands of other web sites are now available over IPv6, adding LinkedIn to those sites is a great addition.

Particularly when LinkedIn has a major focus right now of aiming to recruit people to publish content on their platform – this move means that all that new content will now be accessible to all the new networks that are coming online via IPv6.

Congratulations to Zaid Ali Kahn and the rest of the LinkedIn team that made this happen!  As he notes in his post:

Rolling out IPv6 at scale was not a trivial task. Our IPv6 task force has worked for a year to ensure today’s smooth addition of IPv6 connectivity. We did many code changes and a series of production tests along the way, including a recent 42-hour global test where we saw approximately 3 percent of members visiting LinkedIn services via IPv6. The IPv6 task force was a collective effort of many talented individuals across engineering and operational teams.

Congrats!  And we look forward to many other content providers and web sites joining the production version of the Internet running over IPv6!

If you want to get started with making the move to IPv6, please see our Start Here page to find resources most appropriate to your type of organization.   If you operate a web site like LinkedIn, you may find our “IPv6 for content providers” page the easiest place to start.  And please do let us know if you need more help!

Categories
IPv6

Yea! LinkedIn Joins Facebook And Google In Permanently Enabling IPv6

We were delighted to read today that LinkedIn has now permanently enabled IPv6 for their website.  I proved it myself by visiting the LinkedIn site moments ago using a Google Chrome browser with the IPvFoo extension installed:

LinkedIn goes IPv6

As my colleague Phil Roberts writes on the Internet Technology Matters blog:

As they say, “The transition to IPv6 is invisible for our members.” So if you’re a member who has looked at your LinkedIn profile today, you did this over IPv6 and probably weren’t aware. I’m also encouraged that in their trial run before the full launch, they saw about 3% of their members using IPv6 to reach them.

Given that I have native IPv6 in my home office, presumably my connections to LinkedIn from my various devices will now start to all be over IPv6… which is excellent for the growth of the Internet!

Personally, given how much I do with social media, I’m pleased because this now means that with one exception the major social networks I use will all work over IPv6:

  • Facebook
  • Google … both for Google+ and for YouTube
  • LinkedIn

… which just leaves Twitter as the major social media laggard still stuck on legacy IPv4  (of the social networks I use).

When you consider that other major sites like Yahoo, Wikipedia, AOL, Netflix and thousands of other web sites are now available over IPv6, adding LinkedIn to those sites is a great addition.

Particularly when LinkedIn has a major focus right now of aiming to recruit people to publish content on their platform – this move means that all that new content will now be accessible to all the new networks that are coming online via IPv6.

Congratulations to Zaid Ali Kahn and the rest of the LinkedIn team that made this happen!  As he notes in his post:

Rolling out IPv6 at scale was not a trivial task. Our IPv6 task force has worked for a year to ensure today’s smooth addition of IPv6 connectivity. We did many code changes and a series of production tests along the way, including a recent 42-hour global test where we saw approximately 3 percent of members visiting LinkedIn services via IPv6. The IPv6 task force was a collective effort of many talented individuals across engineering and operational teams.

Congrats!  And we look forward to many other content providers and web sites joining the production version of the Internet running over IPv6!

If you want to get started with making the move to IPv6, please see our Start Here page to find resources most appropriate to your type of organization.   If you operate a web site like LinkedIn, you may find our “IPv6 for content providers” page the easiest place to start.  And please do let us know if you need more help!

 

 

Categories
IPv6

LinkedIn Permanently Enables IPv6 on Its Website

Today, LinkedIn permanently enabled IPv6 on its website, joining Google, Facebook, Yahoo!, and millions of other sites that have enabled IPv6 permanently. This is great news!

You can read the full LinkedIn announcement here. As they say, “The transition to IPv6 is invisible for our members.” So if you’re a member who has looked at your LinkedIn profile today, you did this over IPv6 and probably weren’t aware. I’m also encouraged that in their trial run before the full launch, they saw about 3% of their members using IPv6 to reach them.

IPv6 is the next generation Internet Protocol. Websites and network operators around the globe have been working to enable IPv6 and help to transition the Internet into the future. You can see measurements of network operators who have enabled IPv6 on the World IPv6 Launch measurements website here: http://www.worldipv6launch.org/measurements. You can find resources to help you enable your website or network with IPv6 at our own Deploy360 website here: http://dev.internetsociety.org/deploy360/.

Congratulations to the team at LinkedIn who made this happen. Where are you on your path to full IPv6 deployment? We’d love to hear your story!