Categories
Improving Technical Security Open Internet Standards Technology

Get lucky: The Virtues of Breaking Internet Security

The first Applied Networking Research Prize for 2014 was awarded to Kenny Paterson for finding and documenting new attacks against key Internet security protocols. In their paper, “Lucky Thirteen: Breaking the TLS and DTLS Record Protocols” (Proc. IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy, pp. 526-540, San Francisco, CA, USA, May 2013.), Kenny and his co-author Nadhem Al Fardan demonstrate practical attacks against Transport Layer Security, a fundamental security building block for much of today’s online activity.

Kenny’s presentation to the Internet Research Task Force open meeting in London gave a great insight into the techniques he and others have developed to leverage seemingly tiny differences in the timing of protocol operations to reveal plaintext and thereby break the security of the transaction. There is now a real need for constant-time, constant-memory access implementations to be confident that such potential implementation weaknesses have been completely eliminated (and see [https://www.imperialviolet.org/2013/02/04/luckythirteen.html] for a discussion of how hard that is to achieve in practice).

Kenny noted the importance of the virtuous cycle that sees widely used security protocols gaining a high profile in the research community, leading to more analysis and more development work to patch weaknesses as they are discovered, and ultimately stronger security protocols for everyone. Responsible disclosure practices and close collaboration with the IETF were key aspects in this instance.

Kenny’s slides are available and audio from the presentation is also available starting at 00:18:25.

Categories
Open Internet Standards Technology

Re-live the IETF 89 Panel on "Evolution of End-to-End!"

Were you at IETF 89 in London? Did you attend the Tuesday, 4 March lunch panel on “Evolution of end-to-end: why the Internet is not like any other network?” What did you think?

Moderated by Leslie Daigle (Internet Society) and featuring panelists Fred Baker, Harald Alvestrand, and Andrew Sullivan, the session featured lively discussion on how we got here and what the end-to-end principle means to today’s Internet – and it’s future. From the session abstract:

“In 2004, the IAB published RFC3724, “Future of End-to-End.” The document reviews the important aspects of “smart endpoints, dumb network,” and articulates some perspectives on how Internet engineering was evolving to address those key aspects. Ten years later, evolution has continued — and the Internet’s deployment and evolution are taking new directions in the face of growing awareness of the threat of pervasive monitoring of network traffic. How do we define the end-to-end principle today and is it still an important piece of ensuring a robust, reliable and trusted Internet in 2020?

Each of three panelists will present their predictions for the state of one of the three facets (network, endpoints, infrastructure/middle) in 2020, followed by questions and interactive discussion”

If you missed it, good news! You can see the archived video here on YouTube:

You can also view all the presenters’ slides here on SlideShare:

Categories
Deploy360 Domain Name System Security Extensions (DNSSEC) Events IETF

A Breakfast Gathering of DNSSEC Advocates At IETF 89

One of the great joys of working within the DNSSEC community is the truly outstanding and passionate people that are all focused on how we can make the Internet more secure and trustworthy. Last week at IETF 89 in London a few of us who were there were able to meet for breakfast on Friday morning and we have a photo to prove that (click for a larger version):

DNSSEC Advocates

It was an enjoyable time and several ideas for further activities came out of the conversations that happened there. Plus we got to see who was wide awake at 7:30am and who was desperately needing caffeine. ūüôā

The people there at the breakfast were subscribers to the “dnssec-coord” mailing list that was set up to help in the coordination and communication between people who want to accelerate the deployment of DNSSEC. ¬†That list is open to anyone to join. ¬†We have a monthly conference call and do other work on the mailing list. ¬†Some of the people on the list are able to get to IETF and/or ICANN meetings. ¬†Some of the list subscribers don’t go to those meetings and participate only electronically and on the phone calls. Some are from large companies and some are individual consultants. ¬† ¬†It doesn’t matter… all are welcome to join and be part of the conversation about how to make the Internet more secure via DNSSEC and DANE.

We’d love to have you join us! ¬†If you’d like to help accelerate the adoption of DNSSEC and are interested in the advocacy/promotion/publicity side of the adoption work, please feel free to subscribe to dnssec-coord and join in our efforts.

 

Categories
Deploy360 Domain Name System Security Extensions (DNSSEC) Events IETF To archive

Deploy360@IETF89, Day 5: dnsop, uta

IETF LogoIt’s our last day here¬†at the 89th IETF meeting¬†and it’s been a very exhausting but exhilirating meeting so far! ¬†A lot of excellent work happening in so many areas! Our final day here ends with a number of¬†DNSSEC-related topics being presented in the DNSOP Working Group – while at the¬†exact same time is the first meeting of the brand new UTA Working Goup that is part of the inspiration for¬†our new¬†TLS for Applications¬†area of Deploy360.

After that, there is an afternoon meeting of the Internet Society Advisory Council which a few of us will attend… and then we’ll be heading back home! ¬†Thanks for all the many people who have come up to us and told us about how they appreciate our work – that kind of feedback means a lot and is greatly appreciated!

If you do want to meet with us in these few remaining hours of IETF 89, either find us at one of these sessions or send us email to deploy360@isoc.org.

Thanks, again, for all the great feedback!

Friday, March 7, 2014

dnsop (DNS Operations) WG
0900-1130 UTC, Sovereign Room
Agenda: https://datatracker.ietf.org/meeting/89/agenda/dnsop/
Documents: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/dnsop/
Charter: http://tools.ietf.org/wg/dnsop/charters/

uta (Using TLS in Applications) WG
0900-1130 UTC, Richmond/Chelsea/Tower Rooms
Agenda: https://datatracker.ietf.org/meeting/89/agenda/uta/
Documents: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/uta/
Charter: http://tools.ietf.org/wg/uta/charters/


Remote Participation

You don’t have to be¬†in London¬†to participate in the meetings of IETF 89. You can also:

  • Listen to live audio streams.
  • Participate in Jabber chat rooms to ask questions.
  • Download the slides planned for each session.
  • Listen and watch “Meetecho” conferencing sessions that provide an integrated view of slides, audio, chat and video.

Information about how to participate can be found on the IETF 89 Remote Participation page.  Keep in mind that times for London are in UTC.

Categories
Deploy360 Domain Name System Security Extensions (DNSSEC) Events IETF IPv6 To archive

Deploy360@IETF89, Day 4: dane, sunset4, v6ops, 6tisch, idr, dbound, eppext, sipcore and dnsop

IETF LogoThe fourth day for our Deploy360 team¬†at the 89th IETF meeting¬†could perhaps best be described as “utter madness” as there are multiple working groups meeting on ALL of the topics we cover here: ¬†IPv6, DNSSEC, securing BGP and even our new TLS for Applications area. In particular, several of the major DNS groups are holding their only meetings today.

Details and links are farther down below (along with remote participation info), but as we mentioned in our pre-IETF89 posts about IPv6, DNSSEC and Securing BPG,  today will bring:

  • The meeting of the¬†DANE Working Group¬†(read more about the DANE protocol).
  • The work in¬†SUNSET4¬†on phasing out IPv4 and the second meeting of¬†v6OPS¬†focused on operational guidance for IPv6.
  • The¬†6TiSCH¬†work on IPv6 in resource-constrained “Internet of Things” kinds of networks.
  • The¬†IDR¬†working group¬†has¬†many¬†work items relating to BGP.
  • There is a new¬†DBOUND BOF¬†session that is looking into boundaries in the DNS related to domain names and how those could apply to security policies.
  • In¬†EPPEXT¬†there is an extension proposed for how to securely pass DNSSEC keying material between operators and registries.

Beyond all of those, there are two other Thursday meetings that have come to our attention:

  • In the 1300-1500 block when we already have 3 other sessions of interest, the SIPCORE Working Group is planning a 45 minute discussion on “Happy Eyeballs for SIP” looking at what needs to be done to make SIP work over IPv6. (Where SIP is the dominant open standard used in voice-over-IP.)
  • At the end of the day, a brand new timeslot was opened up from 1840-2040 where the DNSOP Working Group is going to get a head-start on their Friday morning agenda and very specifically focus on the outcome of yesterday’s DNSE BOF around what can be done to protect the confidentiality of DNS queries. ¬†The main point of this evening timeslot is so that TLS can be discussed with some of the people from the UTA Working Group joining in to the discussion (since UTA and DNSOP are scheduled at the same time on Friday morning).

All in all its going to be an extremely busy day for all of us! ¬†We’re looking forward to it, though, as great things are definitely happening!

Thursday, March 6, 2014

dane (DNS-based Authentication of Named Entities) WG
0900-1130 UTC, Park Suite
Agenda: https://datatracker.ietf.org/meeting/89/agenda/dane/
Documents: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/dane/
Charter: http://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/dane/charter/

sunset4 (Sunsetting IPv4) WG
0900-1130 UTC, Palace C
Agenda: https://datatracker.ietf.org/meeting/89/agenda/sunset4/(combined with the Multiple Interface (mif) WG meeting)
Documents: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/sunset4/
Charter: http://tools.ietf.org/wg/sunset4/charters

v6ops (IPv6 Operations) WG
1300-1500 UTC, Sovereign Room
Agenda: https://datatracker.ietf.org/meeting/89/agenda/v6ops/
Documents: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/v6ops/
Charter: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/v6ops/charter/

6tisch (IPv6 over TSCH mode of 802.16e4)
Thursday, March 6, 2014, 1300-1500 UTC, Buckingham Room
Agenda: https://datatracker.ietf.org/meeting/89/agenda/6tisch/
Documents: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/6tisch/
Charter: https://datatracker.ietf.org/doc/charter-ietf-6tisch/ 

idr (Inter-Domain Routing Working Group)
1300-1500 UTC, Blenheim Room
WG Agenda: https://datatracker.ietf.org/meeting/89/agenda/idr
Documents: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/idr/
Charter: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/idr/charter/

sipcore (Session Initiation Protocol Core)
1300-1500 UTC, Palace C
WG Agenda: https://datatracker.ietf.org/meeting/89/agenda/sipcore
Documents: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/sipcore/
Charter: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/sipcore/charter/

dbound (Domain Boundaries) BOF
1520-1650 UTC, Blenheim Room
Agenda: https://datatracker.ietf.org/meeting/89/agenda/dbound/
List of BOFs: http://trac.tools.ietf.org/bof/trac/

eppext (Extensible Provisioning Protocol Extensions) WG
1700-1830 UTC, Park Suite
Agenda: https://datatracker.ietf.org/meeting/89/agenda/eppext/
Documents: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/eppext/
Charter: http://tools.ietf.org/wg/eppext/charters/

dnsop (DNS Operations) WG
1840-2040 UTC, Sovereign Room
Agenda: https://datatracker.ietf.org/meeting/89/agenda/dnsop/
Documents: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/dnsop/
Charter: http://tools.ietf.org/wg/dnsop/charter/


Remote Participation

You don’t have to be¬†in London¬†to participate in the meetings of IETF 89. You can also:

  • Listen to live audio streams.
  • Participate in Jabber chat rooms to ask questions.
  • Download the slides planned for each session.
  • Listen and watch “Meetecho” conferencing sessions that provide an integrated view of slides, audio, chat and video.

Information about how to participate can be found on the IETF 89 Remote Participation page.  Keep in mind that times for London are in UTC.

Categories
Deploy360 Events IETF IPv6

Deploy360@IETF89, Day 3: v6ops, trans, 6lo

IETF LogoToday¬†at the 89th IETF meeting¬†we’re talking a good bit about IPv6. ¬†The day starts with the first session of the IPv6 Operations Working Group (v6ops) that today will be looking at a number of documents about the impact of Neighbor Discovery multicasting on WiFi networks and exploring what can be done to provide operational guidance to network operators.

Later in the day we’ll be looking at IPv6 in the “Internet of Things” and other environments that are “resource-constrained”, i.e. devices with low levels of power, networking or processing capabilities. ¬†That will be in the IPv6 over¬†Networks of Resource-constrained Nodes (6lo) working group, one of the many IPv6 groups we’re monitoring at this IETF meeting.

At the same time that 6lo is meeting (for the first part), at least one of us will also be over in the Public Notary Transparency (trans) Working Group where, as I wrote about last week, they are looking at updating the “Certificate Transparency” work for logging TLS certificate usage. ¬†This has some connection to the work we’re doing with DANE and now as well with TLS for applications.

Along the way, we’ll also be at the IRTF Open Meeting and in various other groups leading up to the Operations and Adminstration Plenary happening tonight and being broadcast live at http://www.ietf.org/live/¬†starting at¬†17:50-20:20 UTC.

If you’d like to meet with us, please¬†do say hello in one of these sessions!

Wednesday, March 6, 2014

v6ops (IPv6 Operations) WG
0900-1130 UTC, Sovereign Room
Agenda: https://datatracker.ietf.org/meeting/89/agenda/v6ops/
Documents: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/v6ops/
Charter: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/v6ops/charter/
(5 March, 0900-1130, 6 March 1300-1500)

trans (Public Notary Transparency) WG
1520-1620 UTC, Blenheim Room
Agenda: https://datatracker.ietf.org/meeting/89/agenda/trans/
Documents: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/trans/
Charter: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/trans/charter/

6lo (IPv6 over Networks of Resource Constrained Nodes) WG
1520-1730 UTC, Balmoral Room
Agenda: https://datatracker.ietf.org/meeting/89/agenda/6lo/
Documents: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/6lo/
Charter: https://datatracker.ietf.org/doc/charter-ietf-6lo/ 


Remote Participation

You don’t have to be¬†in London¬†to participate in the meetings of IETF 89. You can also:

  • Listen to live audio streams.
  • Participate in Jabber chat rooms to ask questions.
  • Download the slides planned for each session.
  • Listen and watch “Meetecho” conferencing sessions that provide an integrated view of slides, audio, chat and video.

Information about how to participate can be found on the IETF 89 Remote Participation page.  Keep in mind that times for London are in UTC.

Categories
Deploy360 Domain Name System Security Extensions (DNSSEC) Events IETF IPv6

Deploy360@IETF89, Day 2: homenet, sidr, grow, dnse, 6man

IETF LogoDay 2 for the Deploy360 team here at the 89th IETF meeting¬†is a big day for routing and for IPv6. Two of the main routing groups, SIDR and GROW, meet today, and our colleague Andrei Robachevsky recently wrote about the important work happening in both groups to make the Internet’s routing infrastructure more secure.

Two of the important IPv6 groups we are monitoring are meeting today: HOMENET and 6MAN. ¬†Homenet is focused on “home networks” and the role IPv6 plays there. ¬†They are doing some very cool work within the group and a couple of our members are there. ¬†In the afternoon, the 6man group will be looking at changes to the IPv6 protocol. As our colleague Phil Roberts recently wrote, a big focus here will be around efficient neighbor discovery.

Today will also have a “Birds of a Feather” (BOF) meeting for the “DNSE” group. ¬†This is not a formal working group but rather a meeting to talk about some potential areas of work within¬†other groups within the IETF. ¬†As I wrote about in a recent post:

Another feature of today will be the “Internet Society @ IETF89 Briefing Panel” today from 11:45-12:45 UTC where the topic is “Evolution of end-to-end: why the Internet is not like any other network“. ¬†It should be quite an interesting discussion that will also be live streamed out via Google+ / YouTube.

If you are here at IETF 89, please do say hello!  And if you are remote, you can follow along using the information at the bottom of the page and also follow us on Twitter at @deploy360 and also @isoctech.

Tuesday, March 4, 2014

homenet (Home Networking) WG
0900-1130 UTC, Sovereign Room
Agenda: https://datatracker.ietf.org/meeting/89/agenda/homenet/
Documents: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/homenet/
Charter: https://datatracker.ietf.org/doc/charter-ietf-homenet/ 

sidr (Secure Inter-Domain Routing)
0900-1130 UTC, Balmoral Room
WG Agenda: https://datatracker.ietf.org/meeting/89/agenda/sidr/
Documents: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/sidr/
Charter: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/sidr/charter/

grow (Global Routing Operations)
1300-1400 UTC, Blenheim Room
WG Agenda: https://datatracker.ietf.org/meeting/89/agenda/grow/
Documents: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/grow/
Charter: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/grow/charter/

dnse (Encryption of DNS request for confidentiality) BOF
1420-1550 UTC, Viscount Room
Agenda: https://datatracker.ietf.org/meeting/89/agenda/dnse/
List of BOFs: http://trac.tools.ietf.org/bof/trac/

6man (IPv6 Maintenance) WG
1610-1840 UTC, Viscount Room
Agenda: https://datatracker.ietf.org/meeting/89/agenda/6man/
Documents: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/6man/
Charter: https://datatracker.ietf.org/doc/charter-ietf-6man/ 


Remote Participation

You don’t have to be¬†in London¬†to participate in the meetings of IETF 89. You can also:

  • Listen to live audio streams.
  • Participate in Jabber chat rooms to ask questions.
  • Download the slides planned for each session.
  • Listen and watch “Meetecho” conferencing sessions that provide an integrated view of slides, audio, chat and video.

Information about how to participate can be found on the IETF 89 Remote Participation page.  Keep in mind that times for London are in UTC.

Categories
Open Internet Standards Technology

Today! Evolution of end-to-end: why the Internet is not like any other network ‚Äď ISOC Briefing Panel at IETF 89

Today at IETF 89 in London, we‚Äôre holding our traditional Internet Society Briefing Panel where we discuss a topic that is relevant to IETF attendees but somewhat beyond the normal realm of discussion in the standards-setting process. This time, the topic is ‚ÄúEvolution of end-to-end: why the Internet is not like any other network.‚ÄĚ

The session required pre-registration, which is full, but the good news is we’ll be livestreaming the hour-long event here.

Date: Tuesday, 4 March 2014
Time: 11:45 am-12:45 pm UTC

Join moderator Leslie Daigle (Internet Society) and panelists Fred Baker, Harald Alvestrand, and Andrew Sullivan. From the session abstract:

“In 2004, the IAB published RFC3724, “Future of End-to-End.”  The document reviews the important aspects of “smart endpoints, dumb network,” and articulates some perspectives on how Internet engineering was evolving to address those key aspects. Ten years later, evolution has continued — and the Internet’s deployment and evolution are taking new directions in the face of growing awareness of the threat of pervasive monitoring of network traffic. How do we define the end-to-end principle today and is it still an important piece of ensuring a robust, reliable and trusted Internet in 2020?
 
Each of three panelists will present their predictions for the state of one of the three facets (network, endpoints, infrastructure/middle) in 2020, followed by questions and interactive discussion.

We’ll be live tweeting the session via our @ISOCtech Twitter handle, so be sure to join us in person in London, tune into the webcast, or follow along on Twitter for what is sure to be a lively and engaging discussion.

Categories
Deploy360 Events IETF

Deploy360@IETF89, Day 1: dnssd, sipcore, technical plenary

IETF LogoOur first day here at the 89th IETF meeting for the Deploy360 team starts off with a lighter schedule… which is okay because later in the week we are double- or triple-booked in some session timeslots! Today the main DNSSEC / DANE session is one that I actually did NOT write about in my “Rough Guide to IETF 89: DNSSEC, DANE and DNS” post because at that time I was not aware that DANE would be discussed in this working group. It’s the “SIPCORE” working group focused on the Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) used in voice-over-IP and while the agenda for the SIPCORE session has not yet been posted as I write this note, Olle Johansson let me know that he’d be talking about SIP and DANE in that session.

In fact, Olle’s slides about SIP and DANE are now posted online and they look quite good. I’m looking forward to that discussion this afternoon!

Prior to SIPCORE, the other group on our watch list will be the DNSSD group that, as I mentioned in the Rough Guide post, is looking at how to extend DNS service discovery past the local network.   Before that, in the morning, odds are that at least one of us will be in the DHC working group as it is focused on DHCP and includes a number of IPv6 issues on its agenda.

The day will conclude with the IETF 89 Technical Plenary that will have as a technical focus “Bitcoin, cybercurrencies and Internet payment systems”. ¬†While not directly connected to the work we do here at Deploy360, it should be an interesting discussion! ¬†If you are not here in London, you can watch the IETF 89 Technical Plenary at:

http://www.ietf.org/live/

That’s what our day 1 looks like at IETF 89 – if you are here please do feel free to find us and say hello!

Monday, March 3, 2014

dnssd (Extensions for Scalable DNS Service Discovery) WG
Monday, March 3, 2014, 1300-1500 UTC, Sovereign Room
Agenda: https://datatracker.ietf.org/meeting/89/agenda/dnssd/
Documents: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/dnssd/
Charter: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/dnssd/charter/

sipcore (Session Initiation Protocol Core) WG
1630-1730 UTC, Blenheim Room
Agenda: https://datatracker.ietf.org/meeting/89/agenda/sipcore/ (not available yet)
Documents: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/sipcore/
Charter: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/sipcore/charter/


Remote Participation

You don’t have to be¬†in London¬†to participate in the meetings of IETF 89. You can also:

  • Listen to live audio streams.
  • Participate in Jabber chat rooms to ask questions.
  • Download the slides planned for each session.
  • Listen and watch “Meetecho” conferencing sessions that provide an integrated view of slides, audio, chat and video.

Information about how to participate can be found on the IETF 89 Remote Participation page.  Keep in mind that times for London are in UTC.

Categories
Human Rights

Internet Society Fellows to IETF 89 ‚ÄĒ increasing the diversity of voices working on Internet standards development

In 2006, the Internet Society introduced the Fellows to the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) programme to increase the diversity of voices  and contributions to the standards development process.  Since then, the Internet Society Fellows to IETF programme has brought more than 175 technologists from 45+ countries to IETF meetings.

These competitive fellowships foster participation of technologists from developing and emerging economies to IETF meetings and working groups.  Typically attracting more than 10 applicants per available award, selected Fellows must also demonstrate how they will apply their learning back to their regions and local communities.

We applaud the ten Fellows selected for the IETF 89 meeting in London for their interest in contributing to Internet standards and the important work of the IETF.

Here is more about their experiences and interests:

Returning fellow Palanivelan Appanasamy currently works with Verizon R&D Labs as Distinguished MTS in India. IETF 89 will be his fourth IETF. He has extensive experience in Telecom and Networking, having previously worked with EMC, Cisco, Juniper, LucentTech and Motorola. His IETF contributions and interests are in the routing, security and transport areas.

First-time fellow Antonio Araujo is from M√©rida, Venezuela.  He is a systems engineer and works as a software developer in CENDITEL, a Venezuelan National Development and Research Center for free and open technologies. Antonio is working on a Masters in Computer Science in Universidad de Los Andes in M√©rida, Venezuela. He is particularly interested in helping IETF Working Groups (WG) as wpkops, tls and oauth.

Nabil Benamar is from Morocco and is involved with the work of some WGs and also non-WGs, namely the ITS (Intelligent Transport Systems) group.  Nabil, a first-time fellow, is a professor of computer networks at the Moulay Ismail University in Meknes, Morocco. His main research topics are DTN, VANET, VDTN, IoT and IPv6. His blog, nabilbenamar.com, acts as a hub for publication of his articles and projects, as well as debates with readers around the world and especially in the Arab region.

As an electronic engineer, Diego Dujovne has worked as a consultant for five years on telecom development and industrial instrumentation in Argentina. He then moved to INRIA Sophia Antipolis, where he developed an experimental methodology for wireless networks that led him to obtain a PhD in Informatics. He is currently researcher and professor at Universidad Diego Portales, Santiago, Chile. Diego’s main research and development topic is the Internet of Things, where he has been working since 1999. In 2013, Diego started to collaborate with the 6TiSCH WG, where he is currently editor of a draft. This is his second IETF.

Ana Hernandez graduated from the Universidad de Los Andes, Merida ‚Äď Venezuela and is a Systems Engineer. A first-time fellow, she is working as a Consultant and Auditor of technological systems, infrastructure and IT operations at Deloitte. Her principal area of interest is Security Automation and Continuous Monitoring.

Sakaio Manoa, originally from Tuvalu, is a returning fellow and is currently studying at the Swinburne University of Technology in Melbourne, Australia for a Masters in Network System specializing in Security. His area of interest is the implementation of IPv6 for which he has been following IETF and the Deploy IPv6 for guidance and direction. 

Fabian Mejia is an Electronics and Telecommunications engineer from Escuela Politecnica Nacional (EPN) in Quito, Ecuador. He works for the association of Ecuadorian ISPs, AEPROVI, where he manages the national IXP, NAP.EC. He is a founding member of the IPv6 Task Force Ecuador (www.ipv6tf.ec) and leads its activities. Fabian was also elected chair of LACNIC’s Regional Interconnection Forum.  His particular areas of interest are BGP routing and IPv6. 

Carlos Paparoni is currently a Systems Engineering student, with a specialization in Computer Systems in the Universidad de Los Andes in Merida, Venezuela working on his undergraduate thesis. His background involves web design and developing server/client side programming. His interests include the JSON, Web Security and IPv6 Working Groups.

Leaf Yeh is a first-time Fellow, but has attended the IETF on five occasions. He is interested in 6man, though his previous contributions to the IETF focused on the WGs of DHC, Softwires and Radext. Leaf is the author of RFC7037, and has worked for China Telecom Research Institute, Conexant Systems. Inc., ZTE Corp. and Huawei Technologies.

Dessalegn Yehuala is a returning fellow, and works for the Computer Science department of Ethiopia‚Äôs Addis Ababa University as Lecturer/Researcher. His research interests include Information Centric Networks, DTN (Delay Tolerant Networks), Multi-path tcp and AQM. He subscribes to four IETF working groups (ICNRG, ICCRG, multipathtcp and AQM).  

Congratulations to all of our IETF 89 Fellows. 

 

Categories
Building Trust Domain Name System Security Extensions (DNSSEC) Improving Technical Security IPv6 Open Internet Standards Privacy Technology

Follow Along With Us at IETF 89 This Week!

It’s here! The whole Internet Society technology team is in London this week, along with about a thousand other Internet engineers, to discuss the latest issues in Internet protocol engineering at IETF 89. There’s a lot going on this week, and we’d love to talk with you about the work we’re doing and how we can help you. In the last ten days or so, we’ve published six “Rough Guide to IETF 89” posts including an overview and five posts related to our major topics:

Coming up this week, we’ll be participating in *tons* of working groups and BoFs related to our topics of interest. We’re also interested in the Technical Plenary tonight, focusing on payment systems and Bitcoin. It will be live-streamed at http://www.ietf.org/live starting at 5:50PM UTC if you’re not here in London with us.

Tomorrow (Tuesday, 4 March), we’re holding our traditional ISOC@IETF briefing panel to discuss the work of the IETF in the context of the Internet and the world at large. This time, during ‚ÄúEvolution of end-to-end: why the Internet is not like any other network‚ÄĚ we’ll be doing a retrospective about the end-to-end principle of the Internet, and considering some predictions for its future relevance. The panel will be live-streamed at https://plus.google.com/events/c1gfue9n0i7f5hanjfu6csgeo3g beginning at 11:45AM UTC. 

For a recap of IETF 88 in Vancouver, check out the latest edition of the IETF Journal. Note you can also subscribe to either the print or online version to receive future issues. We’re always interested in articles for upcoming issues, so if you’re following work at the London meeting and would be willing to provide an update, drop a line to ietfj-editor@isoc.org.

We’re onsite in London capturing as much of the action as possible. Be sure to follow us on follow us on Twitter in particular as there will be lots of updates, photos, and thoughts there. We’ll also post on this Internet Technology Matters blogFacebookGoogle+, and you can follow the blog’s RSS feed. 

We’d love to hear from you! What interests you the most at IETF 89?

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Deploy360 Events IETF

Meet The Deploy360 Team At IETF 89 Next Week

DO Team 2013Will you be at IETF 89 next week in London? ¬†If so, please feel free to say hello to one of our team members there. ¬†We’ll all be there: myself (Dan York), Chris Grundemann, Megan Kruse and Jan ŇĹorŇĺ.

You can expect to find at least one of us in any of the sessions that relate to IPv6, DNSSEC or securing BGP. ¬†Specifically, some of the sessions we’ll be at can be found in these posts:

We’re always interested in talking to people about the work we do here and also how we can help¬†you¬†get these technologies more rapidly deployed. ¬†Got a question for us? ¬†Find us at the IETF sessions and let us know.

You can also send an email to us at “deploy360@isoc.org” if you’d like to set up a time to meet.

See you in London!