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Deploy360 IPv6

Facebook, Akamai Pass Major Milestone: Over 50% IPv6 from US mobile networks

Wednesday was a major milestone for Facebook. For the first time, more people connected over IPv6 than IPv4 from the four major US mobile networks! Facebook’s Paul Saab wrote about this on (where else?) Facebook:

facebook-ipv6-50percent-mobilenetworks

His text:

Today marks the first day that more people used IPv6 to access Facebook than IPv4 from the 4 major USA mobile networks. This is a huge milestone in just 4 short years since World IPv6 Launch in 2012.

Similarly, Erik Nygren at Akamai updated an earlier post last week with a similar view:

As an update as of August 10th, there has been significant growth over the past three months and deployment has crossed a major milestone: over half of requests to dual-stacked sites on Akamai from the top-4 US mobile networks now use IPv6! IPv6 is used around 70% of the time for Android and over 30% of the time for iPhones, up 10% each from May. We have also seen T-Mobile start to deploy IPv6 to iOS devices as well in a dual-stacked configuration.

Today over on the World IPv6 Launch blog, Mat Ford wrote that he is seeing this same milestone in the World IPv6 Launch measurements. The four major US mobile networks of Verizon Wireless, T-Mobile USA, Sprint Wireless and AT&T are seeing a combined measurement of close to 55% IPv6.  His chart:

World IPv6 Launch statistics

All of this shows the very real progress being made in IPv6 deployment.  If you have not started your plans to make your networks, applications and services available over IPv6, what are you waiting for?

To get started, please visit our Start Here page to find resources to help!

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Deploy360 IPv6

Facebook News Feeds Load 20-40% Faster Over IPv6

Facebook logoWant to read your Facebook News Feed faster?  Ask your Internet Service Provider (ISP) if you can get IPv6!  That’s one of the key quotes to me in this article published this month on ComputerWorld:

As for the speed boost that may come with IPv6, it’s too early to say whether you’ll see it or not. Facebook says it has seen users’ News Feeds loading 20 percent to 40 percent faster on mobile devices using IPv6. Tests at Time Warner Cable have shown a 15 percent boost.

Now, yes, there is the caveat from Facebook’s Paul Saab that they are “still trying to clarify the data” and understand exactly why IPv6 users are seeing the speed increase. (And Paul explains further starting about 19 minutes into his recent v6 World Congress presentation.)

But to me this is simply a sign of what is coming.

Facebook has been extremely smart about all of this.  As they outlined in a case study last year, they are moving to an IPv6-only network internally. Their developers are already working on an IPv6-only network, as Paul Saab discussed in a presentation last month to the 2015 v6 World Congress. In that presentation he said that 90% of their network was IPv6-only and they expect to move to 100% by the end of this quarter.

They realize that many of the new networks being deployed around the world to bring the next 4 billion people online are going to need to be using IPv6.  And the expansion of mobile networks to accommodate the millions of new devices will need to use IPv6 (as is already happening!).

And the reality is that connections from users on IPv6 networks to services that run over IPv6 are going to be faster than connections to services still on legacy IPv4 networks that have to go through middleboxes such as NAT devices or application-layer gateways (ALGs).

Facebook wants to provide the fastest connectivity to the billions of new users and devices coming on line.  They want to be reached faster than all the other social networks and messaging services.  They’ve already made the move to IPv6 in anticipation of being able to be faster than all their rivals.  Smart on their part!

While we still need to wait for a thorough analysis by Facebook’s team to know exactly why they are seeing the speed increases, the fact is that those increases are happening.

Don’t have IPv6 yet?  Ask your Internet Service Provider (ISP) why not!

And ask yourself this – does your application or service run over IPv6?  Could people perhaps access your services faster if they were available over IPv6?

Visit our Start Here page to learn how you can do more with IPv6. The time is now.

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IPv6

Facebook News Feeds Load 20-40% Faster Over IPv6

Facebook logoWant to read your Facebook News Feed faster?  Ask your Internet Service Provider (ISP) if you can get IPv6!  That’s one of the key quotes to me in this article published this month on ComputerWorld:

As for the speed boost that may come with IPv6, it’s too early to say whether you’ll see it or not. Facebook says it has seen users’ News Feeds loading 20 percent to 40 percent faster on mobile devices using IPv6. Tests at Time Warner Cable have shown a 15 percent boost.

Now, yes, there is the caveat from Facebook’s Paul Saab that they are “still trying to clarify the data” and understand exactly why IPv6 users are seeing the speed increase. (And Paul explains further starting about 19 minutes into his recent v6 World Congress presentation.)

But to me this is simply a sign of what is coming.

Facebook has been extremely smart about all of this.  As they outlined in a case study last year, they are moving to an IPv6-only network internally. Their developers are already working on an IPv6-only network, as Paul Saab discussed in a presentation last month to the 2015 v6 World Congress. In that presentation he said that 90% of their network was IPv6-only and they expect to move to 100% by the end of this quarter.

They realize that many of the new networks being deployed around the world to bring the next 4 billion people online are going to need to be using IPv6.  And the expansion of mobile networks to accommodate the millions of new devices will need to use IPv6 (as is already happening!).

And the reality is that connections from users on IPv6 networks to services that run over IPv6 are going to be faster than connections to services still on legacy IPv4 networks that have to go through middleboxes such as NAT devices or application-layer gateways (ALGs).

Facebook wants to provide the fastest connectivity to the billions of new users and devices coming on line.  They want to be reached faster than all the other social networks and messaging services.  They’ve already made the move to IPv6 in anticipation of being able to be faster than all their rivals.  Smart on their part!

While we still need to wait for a thorough analysis by Facebook’s team to know exactly why they are seeing the speed increases, the fact is that those increases are happening.

Don’t have IPv6 yet?  Ask your Internet Service Provider (ISP) why not!

And ask yourself this – does your application or service run over IPv6?  Could people perhaps access your services faster if they were available over IPv6?

Visit our Start Here page to learn how you can do more with IPv6. The time is now.

Categories
Deploy360 IPv6

Facebook's iOS Apps Now Work On IPv6-Only Networks

Facebook iOS app iconsFacebook continues to demonstrate their commitment to making sure that people can access Facebook from whatever networks they may be on – and particularly new IPv6-based networks. Not only is Facebook moving to an IPv6-only internal network, but now comes word that their iOS mobile applications, both the regular Facebook app and also the Facebook Messenger app, can work perfectly fine on an IPv6-only network.

The information was relayed by Facebook’s Paul Saab in, of course, the IPv6 Group on Facebook. Back on December 2, Paul wrote:

The most recent release of the Facebook iOS app works on IPv6-only networks. The interesting thing in making this all work, is the example Reachability code that apple released really only showed how to implement it for IPv4 or hostnames, but using a hostname was broken if you were on an IPv4 only network and the hostname was dual stacked. Anyway, the main app is now fixed and our Messenger application will be updated soon to also have the fix.

And late last night he posted:

The FB Messenger was released and now supports IPv6-only networks

As the discussion thread indicates, the Android versions of the two apps should also work on IPv6-only networks but there are currently issues with Android devices in general working on IPv6-only networks.

The key point here is that as some network operators are now deploying IPv6-only networks because of a lack of IPv4 addresses. Consider the case of T-Mobile USA.  Facebook’s applications will work fine and give the best possible user experience on those IPv6-only networks.  Some of these new IPv6-only networks, such as those in the mobile space, use technologies such as 464XLAT to enable IPv4-only applications to still work.  BUT… any such translation technologies do add complexity and introduce some degree of latency (which might be quite tiny, but still there).

Facebook is avoiding all of that by making sure that their mobile applications work well in IPv6-only networks.

Those apps will work over native IPv6 networks to connect back to Facebook’s IPv6 data centers.  Without needing to pass through some IPv4 gateway or translation tool, the apps should provide the fastest and simplest connections – which means a better experience for users.

Now, the Facebook applications also work fine in a “dual-stack” mixed IPv6/IPv4 network.  They have for quite a long time now. But Facebook has now tested these apps on networks without IPv4 – and that is a difference.

Congratulations to Paul Saab and the rest of the team there at Facebook for taking this step – and we hope that other mobile application developers will see this and consider testing their applications on IPv6-only networks as well.

As we run out of IPv4 addresses and have to look at IPv6-only networks with some kind of IPv4 translation on the edge…   the best possible user experience is going to be with those applications and services that can avoid all of the IPv4 translation and work completely over IPv6.

P.S. If you would like to get started with moving your application or service to IPv6, please visit our Start Here page for pointers on how to begin!

 

Categories
IPv6

Facebook's iOS Apps Now Work On IPv6-Only Networks

Facebook iOS app iconsFacebook continues to demonstrate their commitment to making sure that people can access Facebook from whatever networks they may be on – and particularly new IPv6-based networks. Not only is Facebook moving to an IPv6-only internal network, but now comes word that their iOS mobile applications, both the regular Facebook app and also the Facebook Messenger app, can work perfectly fine on an IPv6-only network.

The information was relayed by Facebook’s Paul Saab in, of course, the IPv6 Group on Facebook. Back on December 2, Paul wrote:

The most recent release of the Facebook iOS app works on IPv6-only networks. The interesting thing in making this all work, is the example Reachability code that apple released really only showed how to implement it for IPv4 or hostnames, but using a hostname was broken if you were on an IPv4 only network and the hostname was dual stacked. Anyway, the main app is now fixed and our Messenger application will be updated soon to also have the fix.

And late last night he posted:

The FB Messenger was released and now supports IPv6-only networks

As the discussion thread indicates, the Android versions of the two apps should also work on IPv6-only networks but there are currently issues with Android devices in general working on IPv6-only networks.

The key point here is that as some network operators are now deploying IPv6-only networks because of a lack of IPv4 addresses. Consider the case of T-Mobile USA.  Facebook’s applications will work fine and give the best possible user experience on those IPv6-only networks.  Some of these new IPv6-only networks, such as those in the mobile space, use technologies such as 464XLAT to enable IPv4-only applications to still work.  BUT… any such translation technologies do add complexity and introduce some degree of latency (which might be quite tiny, but still there).

Facebook is avoiding all of that by making sure that their mobile applications work well in IPv6-only networks.

Those apps will work over native IPv6 networks to connect back to Facebook’s IPv6 data centers.  Without needing to pass through some IPv4 gateway or translation tool, the apps should provide the fastest and simplest connections – which means a better experience for users.

Now, the Facebook applications also work fine in a “dual-stack” mixed IPv6/IPv4 network.  They have for quite a long time now. But Facebook has now tested these apps on networks without IPv4 – and that is a difference.

Congratulations to Paul Saab and the rest of the team there at Facebook for taking this step – and we hope that other mobile application developers will see this and consider testing their applications on IPv6-only networks as well.

As we run out of IPv4 addresses and have to look at IPv6-only networks with some kind of IPv4 translation on the edge…   the best possible user experience is going to be with those applications and services that can avoid all of the IPv4 translation and work completely over IPv6.

P.S. If you would like to get started with moving your application or service to IPv6, please visit our Start Here page for pointers on how to begin!

 

Categories
Deploy360 IPv6

Facebook Launches IPv6-Only Data Cluster

If you are a Facebook user and are also interested in using IPv6 wherever possible, Facebook’s Paul Saab just announced yesterday that there is now a special link where you can connect to Facebook’s IPv6-ONLY data cluster. In the IPv6 group on Facebook (of course!) he posted:

Back in March I announced we were working towards having IPv6-only clusters. I’m happy to announce that we’ve successfully launched our latest cluster as IPv6-only. If you want to make sure that you’re using the IPv6-only cluster, we’ve redirected traffic for http://www.v6.facebook.com/ so that it uses it

Just to be 100% clear, you have been able to access Facebook over IPv6 ever since World IPv6 Launch back in 2012 just by going to the regular http://www.facebook.com/ URL.  Users of the IPvFoo/IPvFox browser add-ons have been able to see that we’ve been connecting to Facebook over IPv6.  It’s all worked great.

However, while the connection to the main Facebook page has been over IPv6, that page has also still required some connections over the legacy IPv4 network.

With yesterday’s news from Paul Saab, those of us who want to truly do everything over IPv6 can now do so by connecting to http://www.v6.facebook.com/. Admittedly, this may only be of interest to those of us who are advocates of IPv6, but still, it’s pretty cool to have full access to a major site like Facebook entirely over IPv6!

You may recall that back in March, Paul Saab gave an excellent presentation about how Facebook is moving to entirely using IPv6 within their internal networks.

fb-internal-ipv6

 

His slides are available and you’ll note that on his second to last slide he wrote:

  • Plans for first IPv6 only cluster (no RFC1918) by end of 2014

This news yesterday is the completion of those plans (and well before the end of 2014, too!).

Kudos to Paul and his team at Facebook – it’s great to see this work happening and to have a way we can work with Facebook in pure IPv6-only network. Thanks!

What are you waiting for?  Visit our “Start Here” page to find resources available to help you make the move to IPv6 – and let us know if there is anything more we can do to help you!

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Deploy360 IPv6

Facebook Moving To An IPv6-Only Internal Network

In a brilliant presentation by Facebook’s Paul Saab at the recent v6 World Congress in Paris, he outlined how Facebook is well on the path toward moving to an IPv6-only internal network. He makes the point that why should you deal with the headache of maintaining a dual-stack (IPv4/IPv6). Instead just move your internal network to be IPv6-only and then have dual-stack devices on the edge of the network to interact with the legacy IPv4 Internet. You can download a copy of the slides (and view commentary in the IPv6 Group on Facebook) to read all about the process, but here’s the key summary slide 31:

fb-internal-ipv6

Those statistics are:

  • 100% of  hosts they care about respond on IPv6  (Hosts that are not IPv6 ready are going away.)
  • 75% of internal traffic is now IPv6 with a goal to be at 100% by Q3 2014 or earlier
  • 98% of traffic in and out of HHVM is IPv6
  • 100% of our memcache traffic is IPv6
  • A goal of being 100% IPv6-only in 2-3 years

Very impressive to see!  Paul’s presentation is worth viewing because he outlines the challenges that Facebook faced from dealing with vendor equipment to getting developers to use IPv6.  It’s a great case study that we’ve added to our IPv6 case studies page.  We wrote about this presentation back in March, but it’s worth repeating today on World IPv6 Launchiversary #2.

Facebook very clearly understands the need to move to the production version of the Internet – and they are taking steps to ensure that their site and services will be available to the next 5 billion people who come online!  They are going to be out in front of most other companies with having made the transition over to IPv6.

What are you waiting for?  Visit our “Start Here” page or  check out our IPv6 resources  – and let us know if there is anything more we can do to help you!

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Deploy360 IPv6

Facebook's Extremely Impressive Internal Use of IPv6

Wow!  At the v6 World Congress this week in Paris (where Chris and Jan were), Facebook’s Paul Saab gave a very impressive presentation about what Facebook has gone through to convert its internal network over to IPv6.  Paul has now posted his presentation online (in the IPv6 Group on Facebook, of course) and the story he relays with all the bumps and issues is great to see.  Here’s the key slide at the end showing where they are at:

fb-internal-ipv6

UPDATE: To view the slides at the link above, you need a Facebook login because the slides were posted to the IPv6 Group inside of Facebook.  For those who don’t have a Facebook login, here is a copy of the slides stored on our server.

Those statistics are:

  • 100% of  hosts they care about respond on IPv6  (Hosts that are not IPv6 ready are going away.)
  • 75% of internal traffic is now IPv6 with a goal to be at 100% by Q3 2014 or earlier
  • 98% of traffic in and out of HHVM is IPv6
  • 100% of our memcache traffic is IPv6
  • A goal of being 100% IPv6-only in 2-3 years

VERY impressive!   Paul’s entire presentation is worth a read as he outlines a good number of the challenges they ran into, from vendors equipment not supporting IPv6 to engineers always writing in IPv6 to some of the problems they had with software.  It’s all great info and good to have out there as a case study and for others to learn from.

I love that he ends noting that engineers are asking if they can start writing IPv6-only code today!  (I also enjoy that the “solution” to stopping engineers from writing IPv4-only code was simple: take away IPv4 on development systems! 🙂 )

So… Facebook is going to be out in front of most other companies with having made the transition over to IPv6. What are you waiting for?  Check out our IPv6 resources and let us know if there is anything more we can do to help you!

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Deploy360 IPv6

Facebook To Provide IPv6 Access For Developers On May 18th

Facebook logoAs of May 18, 2012, developers working on Facebook applications will have access over IPv6 to Facebook’s development platform to test their applications out in preparation for World IPv6 Launch.  In a blog post this week, Facebook’s Eric Osgood writes:

With the World IPv6 Launch coming on June 6th 2012, Facebook has committed to enabling IPv6 access for our users on most of our HTTP and HTTPS endpoints. Based on the results of last years IPv6 test on June 8th 2011, we are confident that enabling IPv6 on our platform will be a success. On May 18th, we will be enabling IPv6 on beta.facebook.com ahead of World IPv6 Launch to give our developer community time to discover issues and report bugs back to us.

IPv6 is vital because the Internet’s original addressing system (IPv4) has run out of free space. Since every device on the Internet relies on a unique address to communicate, we must transition to IPv6 which provides over 4 billion times more addresses than IPv4. IPv6 will ensure everyone (users, ISPs, governments, and companies) have direct and open access to the Internet.

We are thrilled to see this news out of Facebook and  look forward to learning of developers ensuring their applications work over IPv6!