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IETF Open Internet Standards Technology

Rough Guide to IETF 93 – Czech It Out!

It’s almost here! Starting on Sunday, 19 July, the Internet Engineering Task Force will be in Prague for IETF 93, where more than 1000 engineers will spend a week discussing the latest issues in open standards and protocols. As usual, the Internet Society is providing a ‘Rough Guide’ to the IETF via a series of blog posts on topics of mutual interest:

  • Routing Resilience and Security
  • Scalability & Performance
  • DNSSEC, DANE, and DNS Security
  • Trust, Identity, and Privacy
  • Strengthening the Internet
  • The IANA Transition

All these posts can be found, and will be archived, through our Rough Guide to IETF 93 overview page at https://dev.internetsociety.org/rough-guide-ietf93.

Here are some of the activities that the Internet Society is involved in and some of my personal highlights.

IETF Journal

Before we get to IETF 93, catch up on some of the highlights from IETF 92 in Dallas by reading Volume 11, Issue 1 of the IETF Journal. You can read all the articles online at https://dev.internetsociety.org/publications/ietf-journal-july-2015, or pick up a hard copy in Prague. The cover article, “ 10 Years of the IETF Journal: How It Began,” continues our year-long celebration of the milestone and offers a retrospective from one of the Journal’s creators and its first editor, Mirjam Kuhne. We also have articles about the first IETF Hackathon, IAB Guidelines for Internet-of-Things Developers, a technical overview of SDN, NFV and more, and reports on ISOC Fellows, Applied Network Research Prize winners, along with the usual Chair Reports from the IETF, IAB, and IRTF Chairs.

Speaking of the IETF Journal, did you know it is now being translated into Russian? The March 2015 issue of the Журнал IETF (Инженерного совета Интернета) is available through our site and the Russian ISOC Chapter. This issue will be translated in a few weeks and linked from the main IETF Journal page.

Jonathan B. Postel Service Award

The Postel Service Award was established by the Internet Society to honor individuals or organizations that, like Jon Postel, have made outstanding contributions in service to the data communications community. During the IETF Operations and Administration Plenary from 09:00-11:30 on Thursday, 23 July, the Internet Society’s President and CEO, Kathy Brown, will present the Jon Postel award to this year’s recipient.

ISOC@IETF Briefing Panel

Internet connectivity speeds and mobile device capabilities vary across the world, but not all application or protocol developers keep that in mind. How do we address this discrepancy? Does the infrastructure need to change? Is this a temporary condition due to uneven global development? These are some of the questions we’ll discuss during the Internet Society Briefing Panel at IETF 93, entitled: Tackling Connectivity Diversity: Protocol Challenges for Constrained Radio Networks and Devices.” The panel takes place during lunch on Tuesday, 21 July. Pre-registration is required to attend this briefing panel in person, but it will also be webcast and audiocast for remote or later viewing. Register online now at https://dev.internetsociety.org/form/isoc-ietf-93-registration.

 

IRTF and ANRP

Through the Applied Networking Research Prize (ANRP, supported by the Internet Society) the Internet Research Task Force (IRTF) recognizes the best new ideas in networking, and brings them to the IETF, especially in cases where the ideas are relevant for transitioning into shipping Internet products and related standardization efforts. In Prague, two talented researchers will present during the IRTF Open Meeting on Monday, 20 July:

Hackathon

Right before IETF 93, the IETF is holding a Hackathon to encourage developers to discuss, collaborate and develop utilities, ideas, sample code and solutions that show practical implementations of IETF standards. The Hackathon is free to attend but limited to 100 attendees. This is the second time the IETF has held a Hackathon before a meeting, and I hope it is a tradition that continues. Read our article about the last Hackathon in the IETF Journal.

Noteworthy

One of the week’s highlights will be the technical plenary on Tuesday, 21 July, which will feature a message from ITU Secretary General Houlin Zhao, a report on the Coordinating Attack Response at Internet Scale (CARIS) Workshop, and the technical talk on Vehicular Communications.

Another major highlight of every IETF is the new work that gets started in birds-of-a-feather (BoF) sessions. Getting new work started in the IETF usually requires a BoF to discuss goals for the work, the suitability of the IETF as a venue for pursuing the work, and the level of interest in and support for the work. There are five BoFs happening in Prague:

Follow Us

There’s a lot going on in Prague, and whether you plan to be there or join remotely, there’s much to monitor. To follow along as we dole out this series of Rough Guide to IETF blog posts, follow us on the Internet Technology Matters blog, Twitter, Facebook, Google+, via RSS, or see http://dev.internetsociety.org/rough-guide-ietf93.

Categories
Growing the Internet IETF Technology

Registration Opens TOMORROW for the ISOC Briefing Panel at IETF 93

As we announced last week, we will once again hold our traditional ISOC@IETF Briefing Panel on Tuesday, 21 July in Prague alongside IETF 93. This time, the topic is Tackling Connectivity Diversity: Protocol Challenges for Constrained Radio Networks and Devices.”

Registration opens TOMORROW, Thursday, 9 July, in two batches at 09:00 UTC and 21:00 UTC for global time zone fairness. Due to high demand for limited seating, pre-registration is required to attend the Briefing Panel in person.

The Briefing Panel will also be webcast and audiocast. No registration is required. Watch this Internet Technology Matters blog or the session page for details.

Abstract

In many areas, Internet connectivity is primarily via low-end mobile devices capable of only 2G or 3G connections to cellular networks. But many application developers live and work with much faster computing platforms and networking environments. Does the infrastructure need to change to accommodate the continuing use of these devices? Is this a transient condition of uneven development, or do we need to re-architect and re-design systems to better cope with connectivity diversity?

Key transports had assumptions built on wireline networks. The next billion users won’t be on wireline networks, and even current users with access to both wireless and wireline networks use wireless networks more often. What does designing for the networks they *will* be on look like – whether at the transport layer or in the application, or at the interface between the two?

In this session during IETF 93, panelists will try to better understand the diversity of Internet connectivity and terminals, and discuss the challenges and responses to these modes of Internet connectivity including:

  • How application developers are dealing with terminal and connectivity diversity
  • Considerations for protocol developers
  • How restricted connectivity impacts user behavior
  • Design principles that could be extrapolated from the data and the technical responses to date
  • How power management and connectivity management interact

Moderator:
TBD, Internet Society

Panelists:
Ted Hardie, independent
Blake Matheny, Facebook
Henning Wiemann, Ericsson

We hope you can join us, either in person or online, for this interesting panel!

Categories
Growing the Internet IETF Technology

At IETF 93, Tackling Connectivity Diversity: Protocol Challenges for Constrained Radio Networks and Devices

Internet connectivity speeds and mobile device capabilities vary across the world, but not all application or protocol developers keep that in mind. How do we address this discrepancy? Does the infrastructure need to change? Is this a temporary condition due to uneven global development? These are some of the questions we’ll discuss during the Internet Society Briefing Panel at IETF 93, entitled: Tackling Connectivity Diversity: Protocol Challenges for Constrained Radio Networks and Devices.”The panel takes place during lunch on Tuesday, 21 July, at the Hilton Prague alongside IETF.

Abstract

In many areas, Internet connectivity is primarily via low-end mobile devices capable of only 2G or 3G connections to cellular networks. But many application developers live and work with much faster computing platforms and networking environments. Does the infrastructure need to change to accommodate the continuing use of these devices? Is this a transient condition of uneven development, or do we need to re-architect and re-design systems to better cope with connectivity diversity?

Key transports had assumptions built on wireline networks. The next billion users won’t be on wireline networks, and even current users with access to both wireless and wireline networks use wireless networks more often. What does designing for the networks they *will* be on look like – whether at the transport layer or in the application, or at the interface between the two?

In this session during IETF 93, panelists will try to better understand the diversity of Internet connectivity and terminals, and discuss the challenges and responses to these modes of Internet connectivity including:

  • How application developers are dealing with terminal and connectivity diversity
  • Considerations for protocol developers
  • How restricted connectivity impacts user behavior
  • Design principles that could be extrapolated from the data and the technical responses to date
  • How power management and connectivity management interact

Moderator:
TBD, Internet Society

Panelists:
Ted Hardie, independent
Blake Matheny, Facebook
Henning Wiemann, Ericsson

Registration & Webcast Information

Pre-registration is required to attend this briefing panel in person, and it always fills up well in advance. Registration will open next week; watch this space or the session page for more information and the registration link.

This event will also be webcast and audiocast. Pre-registration (or IETF attendance) is not required. Again, watch this space or the session page for more information.

We hope you can join us in Prague, or online!