Categories
Growing the Internet Women in Tech

Nominate a Woman Or Girl for an EqualsInTech Award!

Know an amazing woman or girl in tech who’s working for access, skills, or leadership? Why not shine the light on them and nominate them for an EqualsInTech Award!

Equals is an initiative delivered by a committed partnership of ITU, UN Women, GSMA, ITC, and UN University joined by the Internet Society and over 20 corporate leaders, governments, non-profit organizations, communities, and individuals around the world working together to bridge the digital gender divide – by bringing women to tech, and tech to women.

Worldwide, there are an estimated 200 million fewer women than men online. In developed countries, women and men have access to the Internet at comparable levels. But recent research by the Web Foundation shows that women in several developing countries are 50 percent less likely to be connected to the Internet than men in the same age group, where technical literacy levels and high costs are the two main barriers keeping women offline.

But all over the world, when women get access to build or use the Internet, they achieve extraordinary things for themselves and their communities. You can see it every day. We encourage all of you to share stories of women doing incredible things with and for the Internet through our Shine the Light campaign.

It’s key we remind world leaders that the Internet is crucial to closing tech’s gender gap. But for that to happen we need to make sure that all people – and especially women – have the opportunity to build and shape the tools that will so profoundly affect their lives.

There’s no better time to do that than now.

We’re here at the United Nations in New York to discuss the progress on the Global Goals, where 80% of the countries who presented their progress on the Goals highlighted the importance of connectivity to be successful, and many of them acknowledged the need for access for women and girls. 

Your nomination couldn’t happen at a better time. Join us in sending that message by nominating someone for the EqualsInTech award today.  

By nominating someone for an award, you’re helping boost the number of active women in tech for women and girls everywhere. 

Categories
Growing the Internet Internet Governance

We Need Your Vote!

The WSIS Forum 2015 is coming up this May in Geneva and we’re excited to announce two projects the Internet Society is involved with are nominated for a WSIS prize.

The winners will be decided by you – so we need your vote! 

Voting closes May 1st so don’t miss out!

Here’s what’s been nominated:

Under Category 2 African Internet Exchange System project

African Union Commission, ETHIOPIA

The African Internet Exchange System project or AXIS project aims at keeping Africa’s Internet traffic local to the continent. Currently, much of Africa’s Internet traffic is routed through Internet exchange points external to the African continent. As countries establish their own IXPs, Internet traffic will be routed locally, creating a downward pressure on costs and stimulating growth in and distribution of local Internet content. Through the AXIS project, the AU and the Internet Society, working with other African Internet organizations such as AfriNIC, AfNOG and AftLD, is providing capacity building and technical assistance to facilitate the establishment of National Internet Exchange Points and Regional Internet Exchange Points in Africa. Through this collaborative effort the organizations involved are assisting in the development of a more locally operated and, hence, more robust and economically accessible pan-African Internet.

 

Vote for AXIS Now!

 

Under Category 5 Combating Spam for Developing Countries

Internet Society, SWITZERLAND

The Internet Society’s Combating Spam for Developing Countries is designed to address the need for linkages between policy makers, network operators and the technical communities who have the knowledge and expertise to policy makers, network operators and technical communities who are in need of the information so they can address the issue of spam within their counties and join the global effort to stop spam. The Internet depends on the reliable functioning of its infrastructure and applications such as email, social media and texting. Addressing the many concerns that have been raised about what to do and how to approach spam mitigation is an on-going activity due to the ever changing nature of the threats that come from unsolicited forms of electronic communications, or spam. With its partners, M3AAWG, LAP, GSMA and the ITU; the Internet Society is keeping the dialogue on how to combat spam going so that expertise, experiences and lessons learned can be shared with people around the world.

 

Vote in support of fighting spam now!

 

Photo: "Vote" © 2008 Mykl Roventine CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 
Categories
Internet of Things (IoT) IPv6 To archive

IPSO Challenge 2013 Offers $10K To Winner With Best New Internet of Things Idea/Product

IPSO AllianceLooking for an interesting new weekend project?  Are you interested in devices for the “connected home” or the “Internet of Things?”  Have you been automating your home or building sensor networks?  Do you like experimenting with hardware platforms like Arduino or the Raspberry Pi?

Would you like to potentially win $10,000 USD?

If so, check out the IPSO Alliance’s “IPSO Challenge 2013” where the About page explains the challenge:

The IPSO (Internet Protocol for Smart Objects) Alliance is sponsoring a worldwide challenge to showcase the use of the Internet Protocol (IP) in sensor/control and M2M applications enabling the Internet of Things (IOT). IPSO Challenge 2013 is a competition promoting the development of Smart Objects which use the Internet Protocol. Just 30 years after the official adoption of the TCP/IP networking protocol, nearly 10 billion devices can connect to the Internet; and before the end of the decade, that number is forecast to nearly triple. Over the coming years, the vast majority of newly connected devices won’t be computers, tablets, or smartphones, but will be intelligent embedded devices participating in the Internet of Things (IoT).

The deadline to submit a written proposal is coming up soon on APRIL 5, 2013, using the submission form at the bottom of the main IPSO Challenge 2013 page. Semi-finalists will be notified soon thereafter and will need to submit a functional prototype by May 17, 2013.  Ultimately winners will be chosen who will receive $10,000,  $5,000 and $2,500.  More details about what you need to do can be found on the About page for the contest.

Why are we writing about this contest here on Deploy360?  Simple.  The reality is that to get the massive scale being considered for the “Internet of Things” many implementations will need to use IPv6.

We were in contact with the people behind this IPSO Challenge 2013 and they are very definitely interested in receiving IPv6 entries.

So we’d like to encourage any of you developers out there to submit some IPv6 proposals!  It would be great if some of the semi-finalists or finalists were entries working over IPv6.

So… if you like working with these kind of projects, do check out the IPSO Challenge site and submit your ideas!

Categories
IETF

Routing State Distance – a new metric for understanding Internet routing

The Internet Research Task Force (IRTF) has been hosting some of the most interesting talks at recent IETF meetings as the Applied Networking Research Prize winners are given the stage to present the work for which they have been recognised. At the IETF86 meeting in Orlando earlier this month, Gonca Gürsun, a PhD student from Boston University and the most recent recipient of the ANRP, discussed a new metric for analysing the structure of Internet routing.

The Routing State Distance (RSD) metric is a tool to analyse BGP routing policies and can be used for visualisation of networks and routes, detecting patterns in routing behaviour, and provides new insights about the routing fabric of the Internet. RSD is roughly a measure of how similar or dissimilar routes to a given destination network are (for a full explanation, see the paper for which Gonca won her award: Gonca Gürsun, Natali Ruchansky, Evimaria Terzi and Mark Crovella. Routing State Distance: A Path-based Metric For Network Analysis. Proc. ACM Internet Measurement Conference (IMC), November 2012, Boston, MA, USA). This way of looking at the Internet allows us to see some interesting patterns emerge.

Using 48 million routing paths collected from Routeviews and RIPE RIS projects with over 359 Internet vantage points, Gonca and her collaborators set out to understand what RSD could reveal about the structure of Internet routing and the early results are fascinating.

RSD visualisation reveals clusters of networks that make similar routing decisions. The two very distinct clusters in the Figure illustrate the effect of Hurricane Electric’s very open peering policy. Sources always route through Hurricane Electric if the option exists. This is a macro-scale cluster arising from the peering policy of a single operator and it is visible in any random sample from the dataset – a true Internet-wide phenomenon! Gonca’s research also reveals smaller clusters which seem to be driven more by geopolitical concerns and the affinities of operators from specific countries.

RSD is an original and very interesting way to look at the Internet’s routing structure. Promising future directions for the research include going beyond visualisation to detecting routing instabilities and anomalies. Code, data and more information is available at: http://csr.bu.edu/rsd. Gonca’s slides are at: http://www.ietf.org/proceedings/86/slides/slides-86-irtfopen-1.pdf.

ANRP prizes will be awarded at the two remaining IETF meetings this year, and the call for nominations for the 2014 award cycle will open after the summer.