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Events IETF Technology

Rough Guide to IETF 103

Starting next weekend, the Internet Engineering Task Force will be in Bangkok for IETF 103, where around 1,000 engineers will discuss open Internet standards and protocols. The week begins on Saturday, 3 November, with a Hackathon and Code Sprint. The IETF meeting itself begins on Sunday and goes through Friday. We’ll be providing our rough guides on topics of mutual interest to both the IETF and the Internet Society as follows:

For more general information about IETF 103 see:

Here are some of the activities that the Internet Society is involved in during the week.

Applied Networking Research Prize (ANRP)

Through the Applied Networking Research Prize (ANRP), supported by the Internet Society, the Internet Research Task Force (IRTF) recognizes the best new ideas in networking and brings them to the IETF, especially in cases where the ideas are relevant for transitioning into shipping Internet products and related standardization efforts. Out of 55 submissions in 2018, six submissions will be awarded prizes. Two winners will present their work at the IRTF Open Meeting on Monday, 5 November at 4:10PM.

IETF Journal

The IETF Journal provides an easily understandable overview of what’s happening in the world of Internet standards, with a particular focus on the activities of the IETF Working Groups. Articles highlight some of the hot issues being discussed in IETF meetings and on the IETF mailing lists. You can follow IETF Journal via our Twitter and Facebook channels. If you would like to write for the Journal about your work at IETF 103, please email us at ietfjournal@isoc.org.

Other highlights of the IETF 103 meeting include:

Hackathon

Right before IETF 103, the IETF is holding another Hackathon to encourage developers to discuss, collaborate, and develop utilities, ideas, sample code, and solutions that show practical implementations of IETF standards. The Hackathon is free to attend but has limited seats available. Technologies from past Hackathons include DNS, HTTP 2.0, NETVC, OpenDaylight, ONOS, VPP/FD.io, RiOT, SFC, TLS 1.3, WebRTC, YANG/NETCONF/RESTCONF. Details on all planned technologies will be listed on the IETF 103 Meeting Wiki.

Birds of a Feather (BoF) Sessions

Another major highlight of every IETF is the new work that gets started in birds-of-a-feather (BoF) sessions. Getting new work started in the IETF usually requires a BoF to discuss goals for the work, the suitability of the IETF as a venue for pursuing the work, and the level of interest in and support for the work. There are two BoFs happening in Bangkok:

  • Remote Attestation Procedures (rats) Tuesday, 6 November, 13:50 – 15:50. The RATS effort strives to provide evidence about a system’s health and trustworthiness via the Internet. Instead of having a separate set of protocols for each set of mechanisms, the RATS effort will define a common set of protocols that can be used inter-operably over the Internet.
  • WGs Using GitHub (wugh) Wendesday, 7 November, 13:50 – 15:20. A venue to continue discussion about ways that IETF Working Groups are using GitHub. The goal of the meeting is to determine whether there is enough support in the community to warrant more detailed discussions with the IETF Tools Team and the IETF Secretariat about functional requirements and process details to support integrating GitHub use into WG work.

Follow Us

It will be a busy week in Bangkok, and whether you plan to be there or join remotely, there’s much to monitor. Follow us on the Internet Society blogTwitter, or Facebook using #IETF103 to keep up with the latest news.

Categories
Building Trust Events IETF Open Internet Standards Technology

Rough Guide to IETF 102

Starting next weekend, the Internet Engineering Task Force will be in Montreal for IETF 102, where over 1,000 engineers will discuss open Internet standards and protocols. The week begins on Saturday, 14 July, with a Hackathon and Code Sprint. The IETF meeting itself begins on Sunday and goes through Friday. We’ll be providing our rough guides on topics of mutual interest to both the IETF and the Internet Society as follows:

For more general information about IETF 102 see:

Immediately prior to the IETF meeting, ICANN are hosting a DNS Symposium on the theme “Attention, Domain Name System: Your 30-year scheduled maintenance is overdue.” The ICANN DNS Symposium will take place in the same venue as the IETF 102 meeting on Friday 13th July.

Here are some of the activities that the Internet Society is involved in during the week.

Applied Networking Research Workshop (ANRW 2018)

The ACM, IRTF and ISOC Applied Networking Research Workshop will take place on the Monday of IETF week, as part of the Internet Research Task Force (IRTF) mission to foster greater collaboration between researchers and the IETF community. Registration is free for IETF attendees.  The ANRW program is full of great presentations including invited talks and features sessions on TLS, routing, Internet infrastructure, congestion control, traffic engineering, and anonymous communications. The workshop will also feature an extensive poster session.

The workshop will be livestreamed for those not able to attend in person:

9:30-12:00 Monday July 16 Morning session I
http://www.meetecho.com/ietf102/anrw/

13:30-17:50 Monday July 16 Afternoon sessions I and II
http://www.meetecho.com/ietf102/anrw_II/

Applied Networking Research Prize (ANRP)

Through the Applied Networking Research Prize (ANRP), supported by the Internet Society, the Internet Research Task Force (IRTF) recognizes the best new ideas in networking and brings them to the IETF, especially in cases where the ideas are relevant for transitioning into shipping Internet products and related standardization efforts. Out of 55 submissions in 2018, six submissions will be awarded prizes. Two winners will present their work at the IRTF Open Meeting on Tuesday, 17 July at 9:30AM.

GCSC Panel

On Tuesday, 17 July, during IETF 102 in Montreal, the Global Commission on the Stability of Cyberspace (GCSC) will host a lunch panel on “Cyber Diplomacy Meets InfoSec and Technology.” During this session, the Commission wants to inform and engage with the IETF community on its work so far and the work that is in the pipeline.

The Global Commission on the Stability of Cyberspace sets out to develop proposals for norms and policies to enhance international security and stability and guide responsible state and non-state behavior in cyberspace. During this lunch panel GCSC want to engage with the IETF community to discuss the norms they have proposed so far:

In addition, the Commission want to talk about the work that they are currently undertaking on vulnerabilities, their exploitation and disclosure.

The panelists are:

  • Irina Rizmal, Research Fellow at the DiploFoundation specialized in policy analysis in matters pertaining to national security and defense.
  • Bill Woodcock, Commissioner and Executive Director at Packet Clearing House, the non-profit agency that supports critical Internet infrastructure.
  • Jeff Moss, Commissioner, founder of Black Hat and Defcon, member of the DHS security council, and former ICANN CSO.

The panel will be moderated by Olaf Kolkman, GCSC Commissioner and Chief Internet Technology Officer of the Internet Society.

IETF Journal

The IETF Journal provides an easily understandable overview of what’s happening in the world of Internet standards, with a particular focus on the activities of the IETF Working Groups. Articles highlight some of the hot issues being discussed in IETF meetings and on the IETF mailing lists. You can follow IETF Journal via our Twitter and Facebook channels. If you would like to write for the Journal about your work at IETF 102, please email us at ietfjournal@isoc.org.

Other highlights of the IETF 102 meeting include:

Hackathon

Right before IETF 102, the IETF is holding another Hackathon to encourage developers to discuss, collaborate, and develop utilities, ideas, sample code, and solutions that show practical implementations of IETF standards. The Hackathon is free to attend but has limited seats available. Technologies from past Hackathons include DNS, HTTP 2.0, NETVC, OpenDaylight, ONOS, VPP/FD.io, RiOT, SFC, TLS 1.3, WebRTC, YANG/NETCONF/RESTCONF. Details on all planned technologies will be listed on the IETF 102 Meeting Wiki.

Technical Plenary

One of the week’s highlights is the plenary meeting. It will take place on Wednesday, 18 July, from 17:10-19:40. The event is live streamed.

Birds of a Feather (BoF) Sessions

Another major highlight of every IETF is the new work that gets started in birds-of-a-feather (BoF) sessions. Getting new work started in the IETF usually requires a BoF to discuss goals for the work, the suitability of the IETF as a venue for pursuing the work, and the level of interest in and support for the work. There are three BoFs happening in Montreal:

  • DNS Resolver Identification and Use (driu)Thursday, 19 July, 15:50-17:50 The IETF has added additional methods for DNS stub resolvers to get to recursive resolvers (notably DNS-over-TLS, RFC 7858), and is about to add another (DNS-over-HTTPS, from the DOH Working Group). As these have been developed, questions have been raised about how to identify these resolvers from protocols such as DHCP and DHCPv6, what the security properties these transports have in various configurations (such as between strict security and opportunistic security), and what it means for a user who has multiple resolvers configured when the elements of the configured set have different transports and security properties.This BoF is not intended to form a Working Group. Instead, it is meant to bring together authors of various WG and individual drafts to prevent overlap and to garner interest in particular topics.
  • Internationalization Review Procedures (i18nrp) Monday, 16 July, 13:30 – 15:30 This BOF is to examine procedural and structural options for moving forward with work on internationalization topics in the IETF, or deciding not to work on that topic.
  • The Label “RFC” (rfcplusplus) Wednesday, 18 July, 18:10 – 19:40 This BoF is intended to discuss a proposed experiment to tackle the “regrettably well-spread misconception” that all RFCs are standards.

Follow Us

It will be a busy week in Montreal, and whether you plan to be there or join remotely, there’s much to monitor. Follow us on the Internet Society blog, Twitter, or Facebook using #IETF102 to keep up with the latest news.

Categories
IETF Improving Technical Security Open Internet Standards Technology

Applied Networking Research Workshop – Paper Submission Deadline: 3 April

We’re excited to share news of the second Applied Networking Research Workshop (ANRW2017), which will take place in Prague, Czech Republic, on July 15. This one-day workshop will be co-sponsored by the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), the Internet Society and the Internet Research Task Force (IRTF). The Call for Papers is open now, with a deadline of 3 April.

This academic workshop will provide a forum for researchers, vendors, network operators and the Internet standards community to present and discuss emerging results in applied networking research. Accepted papers will be published in the ACM Digital Library.

ANRW2017 particularly encourages the submission of results that could form the basis for future engineering work in the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), that could change operational Internet practices, that can help better specify Internet protocols, or that could influence further research and experimentation in the IRTF.

If you have some relevant work and would like to join us in Prague for the workshop and potentially stay for the IETF 99 meeting that takes place in the following week, please see the full Call for Papers, which includes detailed paper submission and formatting instructions.

I hope to see you in Prague for what promises to be a very interesting workshop and a good warm-up for the IETF and IRTF meetings to follow.

Categories
IETF Improving Technical Security Open Internet Standards Technology

Applied Networking Research Prize: Winners Announced, Nominations for 2017 Open

As we rapidly approach the last Internet Engineering Task Force meeting for the year, we’re pleased to report that the final winners of the Applied Networking Research Prize (ANRP) for 2016 have been announced.

The ANRP awards for IETF 97 go to:

For the 2016 award period of the ANRP, 53 eligible nominations were received. Each submission was reviewed by several members of the selection committee according to a diverse set of criteria, including scientific excellence and substance, timeliness, relevance, and potential impact on the Internet. Based on this review, six submissions are awarded an Applied Networking Research Prize in 2016.

Olivier and Benjamin will present their work at the IRTF Open Meeting during IETF 97 in Seoul, Republic of Korea. Remote participation details will be available in due course.

The nomination window for ANRP 2017 is now open and you can submit nominations for the 2017 award period of the Applied Networking Research Prize until November 6, 2016. More information about the ANRP is available including full details of the nomination process.

Please nominate (or self-nominate) and help to support great networking research in getting the recognition it deserves at the IETF in Chicago, Prague or Singapore in 2017!

Categories
Building Trust IETF Improving Technical Security Open Internet Standards Technology

Bringing Internet Research to the IETF: Inaugural Applied Networking Research Workshop Program Now Available

The Internet grew out of the networking research community and there remain tremendous synergies between the research community and the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), the world’s premier Internet standards development organisation. For several years, the Internet Research Task Force (IRTF) has been awarding prizes to researchers whose work is most relevant for transitioning into shipping Internet products and related standardization efforts. These Applied Networking Research Prizes include the opportunity for researchers to travel to and present their work at IETF meetings.

Now, in a bigger and bolder effort to increase researcher involvement in the IETF and to expose more IETF attendees to the latest networking research results, we are helping to organise the first Applied Networking Research Workshop which will take place on Saturday, 16 July, immediately prior to the IETF 96 meeting in Berlin, Germany.

The preliminary workshop program is now available online and includes sessions on Multipath, SDN Routing & Peering, Transport Quality & “Happy Eyeballs”, Measurement, and Internet Media. Accepted papers will be made available at no charge via the ACM Digital Library in due course.

The inaugural ACM, IRTF & Internet Society Applied Networking Research Workshop 2016 (ANRW’16) is an academic workshop that provides a forum for researchers, vendors, network operators and the Internet standards community to present and discuss emerging results in applied networking research. It is sponsored by ACM SIGCOMM, the IRTF and the Internet Society.

This academic workshop is open to all; the registration fee is $100 USD. See https://irtf.org/anrw/2016/attend.html for details. Student travel grants are available and the deadline to apply for those is June 24, 2016.

So if you’re already planning to be in Berlin for IETF, check out the program and consider extending your trip by a day to take in these great research talks. And if you’re a researcher new to the IETF, please apply for a travel grant if that’s appropriate, come along to the workshop, and take advantage of the free 1-day guest passes for researchers to attend the IETF.

Categories
IETF Open Internet Standards Technology

A Newcomer's Experience at IETF 92

IETF 92 was a unique experience compared to the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and USENIX conferences I regularly attend. Naturally, IETF is more focused on concrete solutions and detailed specifications for working systems, as opposed to conceptual research. This practical focus appealed to my interest in “systems building” research.

By attending working and research group sessions closely related to my research–in particular, SFC, NFVRG, and SDNRG–I gained a better understanding of: (1) what problems are currently in need of solutions, (2) what problems will need to be solved in the near future, and (3) what constraints shape the space of possible solutions. For example, the SFC session had a presentation on dealing with legacy network functions, which is a problem I have attempted to address in some of my past research. This presentation affirmed the relevancy of this problem. Moreover, discussions during this session made me realize that the solution I had originally proposed–re-purposing some field in the Ethernet or IP header to serve as a tag–is not well suited for an actual deployment. It seems that making it easier to retrofit legacy functions with support for new SFC standards–e.g., using program analysis techniques–may be a more viable approach.

In the NFVRG session, there were several presentations on open source virtual network function management and orchestration (MANO) frameworks. These frameworks address some of the practical issues I have encountered in my research–e.g., high speed forwarding of packets to network function virtual machines. I plan to use some of these frameworks to conduct more realistic evaluations of the solutions/systems I have developed.

One of my favorite sessions was the plenary presentation on security in the Internet-of-Things. There has been little discussion on this topic at the networking conferences I regularly attend, so this presentation provided a great introduction to this emerging area.

In summary, attending IETF has given me new research problems to think about, and helped me identify better ways to evaluate my research. It’s also improved my teaching: I am now better equipped to teach students about Internet standards and the Internet-of-Things.

Categories
Domain Name System (DNS) IETF Improving Technical Security Privacy

DNS Privacy and Route-Aggregation Research Awarded 2015 ANRP; 2016 Nominations Open

The latest recipients of the Applied Networking Research Prize (ANRP) for 2015 are Haya Shulman and João Luís Sobrinho. Shulman won her award for analyzing the deficiencies of different approaches to DNS privacy. You can read the full paper at https://www.ietf.org/mail-archive/web/dns-privacy/current/pdfWqAIUmEl47.pdf.

Sobrinho and his co-authors won their award for designing a route-aggregation technique that allows filtering while respecting routing policies. You can read the full paper at http://www.cs.princeton.edu/~jrex/papers/dragon14.pdf.

Shulman and Sobrinho have been invited to present their findings to the Internet Research Task Force open meeting during IETF 93 in July in Prague, Czech Republic. Remote participation details and the exact timing of their presentations will be available at https://www.ietf.org/meeting/93/index.html in due course.

For the 2015 award period of the ANRP, 33 eligible nominations were received. Each submission was reviewed by 3-5 members of the selection committee according to a diverse set of criteria, including scientific excellence and substance, timeliness, relevance, and potential impact on the Internet. Based on this review, five submissions will be awarded prizes in 2015. The first ANRP award for 2015 was given to Aaron Gember-Jacobson.

Nominations for the 2016 ANRP awards is now open. Nominations can be submitted until 31 October 2015 via the ANRP submission site. You can also read more about the awards and how to nominate.

Categories
IETF Technology

First ANRP Award of 2015 Goes to Aaron Gember-Jacobson for Innovative Network Function Control Plane

The Applied Networking Research Prize (ANRP) selection committee completed its work at the end of last year and it gives me great pleasure to announce the first prize winner for 2015 is Aaron Gember-Jacobson. Aaron and his co-authors won the award for designing and evaluating a Network Functions Virtualisation control plane. You can read the full paper at http://agember.com/docs/gember-jacobson2014opennf.pdf and read more about OpenNF at http://opennf.cs.wisc.edu.

When network functions like routing and firewalling are virtualised and distributed, new challenges arise. Aaron’s work is defining a way to coordinate all these virtualised elements so that operators can provision and manage services efficiently.

Aaron has been invited to present his findings to the Internet Research Task Force open meeting during IETF 92 in Dallas, Texas, USA. Remote participation details and the exact timing of Aaron’s presentation will be available at https://www.ietf.org/meeting/92/index.html in due course.

For the 2015 award period of the ANRP, 33 eligible nominations were received. Each submission was reviewed by 3-5 members of the selection committee according to a diverse set of criteria, including scientific excellence and substance, timeliness, relevance, and potential impact on the Internet. Based on this review, five submissions will be awarded prizes in 2015.

The call for nominations for the 2016 awards will open later this year. Read more about the ANRP at http://isoc.org/anrp.

Categories
IETF Open Internet Standards Technology

Final 2014 Applied Networking Research Prize (ANRP) Winners Announced – 2015 Nominations Open Now!

As we rapidly approach the last Internet Engineering Task Force meeting for the year, it’s time to announce the final winners of the Applied Networking Research Prize for 2014.

The ANRP awards for IETF 91 go to:

Sharon, Tobias and Misbah have been invited to present their findings in the Internet Research Task Force open meeting during IETF 91 in Honolulu, Hawaii, USA, on November 11th. Remote participation details will be available at https://www.ietf.org/meeting/91/index.html.

The call for nominations for the 2015 ANRP award cycle remains open until October 31st. Submit your nominations via the submission site or by email to anrp@irtf.org to support great networking research getting the recognition it deserves!

Categories
IETF Improving Technical Security Technology

Routing Security on the Internet – Is it Really Worth the Effort?

A security researcher from Georgia Institute of Technology has called into question the efforts underway to secure the Internet’s routing infrastructure. Robert Lychev’s findings are striking and the paper he and his co-authors wrote earned them the third Applied Networking Research Prize for 2014.

Many widely used communication protocols on the Internet were not originally designed with security in mind: they were intended for parties that trust each other. As the Internet has evolved, many new protocols intended to address specific security vulnerabilities have been developed. Deployment of these new protocols can take a long time and therefore questions about the interactions of new secure protocol solutions with legacy insecure protocols are important.

For routing of Internet traffic, Border Gateway Protocol (or BGP) is a key technology and much work has been done to address the real security vulnerabilities of BGP through developments like the Resource Public Key Infrastructure (RPKI) and BGP Security Extensions (BGPSEC). Lychev and his collaborators were interested in understanding the security properties of BGPSEC in partial deployment. In particular, what does partially deployed BGPSEC offer over RPKI or, “Is the juice (additional security benefits) worth the squeeze (extra efforts of deployment)?”

In their paper, “BGP Security in Partial Deployment” (Proc. ACM SIGCOMM, Hong Kong, China, August 2013), Lychev and his co-authors Sharon Goldberg and Michael Schapira found that partially deployed security measures sometimes introduce new vulnerabilities and partial deployment provides only meagre benefits over RPKI if operators do not prioritise security over all other considerations in their routing policies.

Speaking about the award and his trip to the IETF meeting in Toronto, Lychev said, “Thank you very much for making this trip possible. I think that I have learned quite a bit from this meeting. I met a lot of people, and I hope to start new collaborations with some of them in the near future.”

Lychev received his award at the recent Internet Research Task Force open meeting at IETF 90 in Toronto, where he also presented his results. His slides are available and audio from the presentation is also available (starting at 00:09:00).

The nomination period for Applied Networking Research Prizes to be awarded in 2015 is now open. Please submit your nominations for the 2015 ANRP award before the closing date of October 31, 2014. Nominations can be submitted via the submission site or by email to anrp@irtf.org.

Categories
IETF Open Internet Standards Technology

Enhancing Video Over Mobile – Predicting the Future is Key

Trying to conduct a videoconference over a cellular network in a moving car “wasn’t working very well” for Keith Winstein, so he started trying to find a solution to the problem. The result was a new transport protocol called “Sprout” and the paper he and his co-authors wrote earned Winstein the second Applied Networking Research Prize for 2014.

Winstein won the 2014 ANRP for designing a transport protocol for interactive applications that desire high throughput and low delay. In their paper, “Stochastic Forecasts Achieve High Throughput and Low Delay over Cellular Networks” (Proc. 10th USENIX Symposium on Networked Systems Design and Implementation (NSDI), Lombard, IL, USA, April 2013.), Keith and his co-authors Anirudh Sivaraman and Hari Balakrishnan describe Sprout, a transport protocol that works well over cellular wireless networks, where link speeds change dramatically with time, and current protocols build up multi-second queues in network gateways.

Motivated by his sub-par videoconferencing experience, Keith and his team developed a novel end-to-end transport protocol that tries to maximise throughput whilst simultaneously bounding the risk of delay by modelling the variation in link speed based on observations of packet arrival times. The model is then used to predict the future link speed.

The results are compelling: experiments conducted on traces from four commercial cellular networks show many-fold reductions in delay, and increases in throughput, over Skype, Facetime, and Hangout, as well as over Cubic, Compound TCP, Vegas, and LEDBAT. Although Sprout is an end-to-end scheme, in this setting it matched or exceeded the performance of Cubic-over-CoDel, which requires modifications to network infrastructure to be deployed.

Keith received his award at the recent Internet Research Task Force open meeting at IETF 89 in London, where he also presented his results. Keith’s slides are available and audio from the presentation is also available (starting at 01:22:35).

The next ANRP nomination period for prizes to be awarded in 2015 will start later this year – stay tuned for more information on the nomination process.

Categories
Improving Technical Security Open Internet Standards Technology

Get lucky: The Virtues of Breaking Internet Security

The first Applied Networking Research Prize for 2014 was awarded to Kenny Paterson for finding and documenting new attacks against key Internet security protocols. In their paper, “Lucky Thirteen: Breaking the TLS and DTLS Record Protocols” (Proc. IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy, pp. 526-540, San Francisco, CA, USA, May 2013.), Kenny and his co-author Nadhem Al Fardan demonstrate practical attacks against Transport Layer Security, a fundamental security building block for much of today’s online activity.

Kenny’s presentation to the Internet Research Task Force open meeting in London gave a great insight into the techniques he and others have developed to leverage seemingly tiny differences in the timing of protocol operations to reveal plaintext and thereby break the security of the transaction. There is now a real need for constant-time, constant-memory access implementations to be confident that such potential implementation weaknesses have been completely eliminated (and see [https://www.imperialviolet.org/2013/02/04/luckythirteen.html] for a discussion of how hard that is to achieve in practice).

Kenny noted the importance of the virtuous cycle that sees widely used security protocols gaining a high profile in the research community, leading to more analysis and more development work to patch weaknesses as they are discovered, and ultimately stronger security protocols for everyone. Responsible disclosure practices and close collaboration with the IETF were key aspects in this instance.

Kenny’s slides are available and audio from the presentation is also available starting at 00:18:25.