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Building Trust IETF Privacy

Edward Snowden Highlights Identity and Privacy at IETF 93

Sunday night, a group of IETF 93 attendees organized an unofficial, but unique event[1]. Edward Snowden was a surprise (remote participant) guest in a question and answer session after a screening of the documentary Citizenfour. It was movie night at the IETF – a first in all my many years in this community.

The obvious highlight of the evening was the live discussion with Mr. Snowden. It was both interesting and inspirational, especially through the lens of our ISOC work. It included topics ranging from ownership of the Internet to the vital role of specific technologies in improving privacy. All of the discussion was framed in terms closely aligned with our ISOC mission that “the Internet is for everyone” and a safe Internet promotes human rights.

Mr. Snowden discussed who the Internet is for and who controls it. He stated that “governments or countries don’t own the Internet, the public does.” He called on the community to make the Internet safe for everyone all the time, and not to allow others to determine who is safe and who is not. He reminded the IETF that users of the Internet are the ultimate customers of our products. “We should ensure our protocols follow users’ intent.”

Moving on from general topics, the discussion dove into specific technical questions. Middleboxes in particular were a frequent target of criticism with statements like “every middlebox is an increased attack surface.” He talked about the need to secure metadata along with content reminding us of the vital information included in metadata. It is well past time for emerging protocols to properly address the collection and sharing of unnecessary information.

Of particular interest to our work here at ISOC, Mr. Snowden talked about the importance of identity in this space. He talked about the need for anonymous and pseudonymous communications and the ability to separate identity from personas.

Moving further down into the technical details, there was a discussion about IEEE 802 MAC addresses and their role in tracking. Juan Carlos Zuniga mentioned the Wi-Fi privacy experiment that has been conducted at the last few IETFs which has resulted in an IEEE 802 project to define MAC address privacy. Mr. Snowden supported the work by stating, “Burned in long lasting hardware addresses are extremely dangerous.”

As the session was wrapping up, Snowden specifically called out the Cryptech effort as “awesome.” This is an activity that was initiated by conversations within the IETF community to develop an open source hardware crypto module developed in a transparent manner. In fact, just prior to the IETF there was an open workshop on cryptech where participants could install the prototype and use it to sign a DNS zone.

There were standing ovations at the beginning and end and several bouts of spontaneous applause from the appreciative audience. In my decades of IETF participation, I must say it was a first.

Special kudos to Mark Nottingham who arranged the screening, and Daniel Kahn Gillmor who arranged for Edward Snowden’s appearance. You can read more about Mark’s thoughts on the event in his own words by reading his “Snowden Meets the IETF” blog post.

Thank you for a fascinating and inspirational beginning to this week’s IETF.


[1] Editorial note: To explain a bit more, a group of individuals attending IETF 93 got together, requested meeting room space,paid for the screening of the movie and invited people to attend. This was not an official IETF activity although it was at the IETF 93 venue.

Categories
Building Trust Identity IETF Privacy

Rough Guide to IETF 93: Trust, Identity, and Privacy

Wrapping up the series of Rough Guide posts for IETF 93 is our focus on Trust, Identity, and Privacy. ISOC has been working over the past six years in these areas, and each subsequent IETF has seen advancing work and progress being made on multiple fronts. IETF 93 is no exception. During IETF 92, I mentioned a new mailing list that was created to discuss vectors of trust, a potential replacement for NIST SP 800-63. For this meeting, there has been a preliminary draft published (https://tools.ietf.org/html/draft-richer-vectors-of-trust-00), and an informal meeting is being organized to discuss it. The meeting will be held on Wednesday, 22 July 2015 at 7:45 pm in the Florenc Room. The impetus for this mailing list came out of an ISOC-sponsored workshop this past September. It is hoped that these discussions will lead to further consensus on concepts around trust and levels of assurance. Monitor the mailing list for details. This is a great opportunity to get involved in a potential IETF activity at a very early stage.

Next, the W3C Privacy Interest Group (PING) (https://www.w3.org/Privacy/) will again be meeting face-to-face alongside IETF on Thursday, 23 July 2015 in the Rokoska room between 11:30 and 13:00. The main topic will be the draft TAG privacy and security questionnaire: https://w3ctag.github.io/security-questionnaire/. Please join the meeting if you have an interest in privacy on the Web and would like to help develop better privacy features in Web standards.

As for the IETF working groups, there are several ongoing working groups addressing relevant topics in this space. We are particularly interested in a number of activities around the Web PKI at this meeting. First, there is a new draft outlining both the technical and non technical issues associated with the current web pki system. (https://tools.ietf.org/html/draft-housley-web-pki-problems-00) This draft will be considered within the context of the IAB Security and Privacy Program. There has also been interest expressed in the draft outside the IAB, so I look forward to some quality hallway conversations on this document.

The newly formed Automated Certificate Management Environment (acme) working group is working to lower the barrier to deployment of certificates for the Web PKI. In particular, the acme working group is looking for ways to automate certificate issuance, validation, revocation and renewal. The agenda for this meeting includes the protocol, use cases, and suggested changes to JWS Signing Input Options.

Certificate Transparency continues to show promise as one mechanism to improve trust in the infrastructure. The web PKI certificate infrastructure continues to be a source of trust related operational issues in the Internet. The primary effort of the trans (Public Notary Transparency) working group is the generation of a standards track version of the experimental RFC 6962 on Certificate Transparency. The primary focus of this week’s discussion will be resolution of issues on the update to RFC 6962. Additional topics for this week’s agenda include a threat analysis, client behavior, and the gossip protocol.

Finally, a rough guide entry doesn’t seem complete without mention of the oauth WG. The oauth (Web Authorization Protocol) working group has a full agenda for its Wednesday evening meeting based around its continuing work on proof-of-possession security assertions, token introspection, and token exchange among others.

As you can see, the IETF is devoting a significant amount of time and energy on efforts related to trust, identity, and privacy. There is plenty to follow and contribute to in this space.

Related Meetings, Working Groups, and BOFs at IETF 93:

ace (Authentication and Authorization for Constrained Environments) BOF
Wednesday, 22 July 2015; 0900-1130, Karlin I/II
Agenda: https://tools.ietf.org/wg/ace/agenda
Documents: https://tools.ietf.org/wg/ace
Charter: https://tools.ietf.org/wg/ace/charter

acme (Automated Certificate Management Environment) WG
Thursday, 23 July 2015; 1520-1720, Congress Hall III
Agenda: https://tools.ietf.org/wg/acme/agenda
Documents: https://tools.ietf.org/wg/acme/
Charter: https://tools.ietf.org/wg/acme/charters

oauth (Web Authorization Protocol) WG
Wednesday, 22 July 2015, Athens/Barcelona
Agenda: https://tools.ietf.org/wg/oauth/agenda
Documents: https://tools.ietf.org/wg/oauth
Charter: https://tools.ietf.org/wg/oauth/charter

trans (Public Notary Transparency) WG
Thursday, 23 March 2015, 1740 – 1910, Karlin III
Agenda: https://tools.ietf.org/wg/trans/agenda
Documents: https://tools.ietf.org/wg/stir/
Charter: https://tools.ietf.org/wg/trans/charter

Follow Us

There’s a lot going on in Prague, and whether you plan to be there or join remotely, there’s much to monitor. To follow along as we dole out this series of Rough Guide to IETF blog posts, follow us on the Internet Technology Matters blog, Twitter, Facebook, Google+, via RSS, or see http://dev.internetsociety.org/rough-guide-ietf93.

Categories
Building Trust IETF Improving Technical Security Open Internet Standards Privacy Technology

Rough Guide to IETF 93: Strengthening the Internet

Strengthening the Internet and encryption continue to be active areas for the IETF community. The news stories related to encryption just seem to keep coming. Now some governments are even considering requiring key escrow or banning encryption outright. The stakes continue to rise in this discussion. In this section of the Rough Guide, we will focus on CrypTech, the IAB Privacy and Security program, the Crypto Forum Research Group, and a few relevant IETF work groups happening at IETF 93 in Prague next week.

First, CrypTech (website: https://cryptech.is; wiki: https://trac.cryptech.is/wiki; mailing list: https://wiki.cryptech.is/wiki/MailingLists) is a project to create an open hardware cryptographic engine developed in a transparent manner. While this project is technically outside the scope of the IETF, it was originally started with the support of IETF and IAB leadership. CrypTech is making excellent technical progress, but it needs to establish more robust and stable funding.

At IETF 93, there will be several opportunities to learn more about the CrypTech project and to get involved. First, there will be a hands-on workshop on Saturday, 18 July, to learn more about the current state of the project. A detailed agenda is available here: (https://trac.cryptech.is/wiki/PrahaWorkshop) CrypTech will also be an agenda item in the saag and cfrg meetings mentioned below. This is an interesting project with great potential and many opportunities to participate and contribute.

Moving on, the Internet Architecture Board (IAB, www.iab.org), through its Privacy and Security Program (https://www.iab.org/activities/programs/privacy-and-security-program/) is continuing to work on the topic of confidentiality. A document on “Confidentiality in the Face of Pervasive Surveillance: A Threat Model and Problem Statement” (https://tools.ietf.org/html/draft-iab-privsec-confidentiality-threat-07) has been approved and is in the final steps of publication. The program is now working on a mitigations draft entitled “Confidentiality in the Face of Pervasive Surveillance” (https://tools.ietf.org/html/draft-iab-privsec-confidentiality-mitigations-02). Now is an excellent time to find some of the program participants and discuss this document with the authors.

While this is not an IETF 93 activity, the IAB is also working with the GSMA to plan a workshop on Managing Radio Networks in an Encrypted World (MaRNEW). There is still time to put together position papers if you feel you have something to contribute in this space. (https://www.iab.org/activities/workshops/marnew/) The workshop is planned for 24-25 September in Atlanta, GA, and there should be interesting results to review in time for IETF 94.

Next, the Internet Research Task Force (IRTF) Crypto Forum Research Group (cfrg, https://irtf.org/cfrg) continues to focus on use of cryptography for IETF protocols. It has been focusing extensively on the selection of new elliptic curves for use in IETF protocols, and rough consensus on this topic is documented in “Elliptic Curves for Security” (https://tools.ietf.org/html/draft-irtf-cfrg-curves-02). Hot topics at the meeting this week will include pake schemes, extended hash-based signatures, and elliptic curve signatures. Anyone interested in the future direction of cryptographic curves and algorithms would be well served to follow these discussions.

There are also a number of IETF working groups progressing efforts related to strengthening the Internet that will be meeting this week. In this post I will focus on tls and uta. Other working groups also working on strengthening the Internet are discussed in the “ DNSSEC, DANE, DPRIVE, and DNS Security” and the soon-to-come “Trust, Identity, and Privacy” Rough Guide posts.

The Transport Layer Security (tls) working group is actively working on an update to the TLS protocol (https://tools.ietf.org/html/draft-ietf-tls-tls13-07). This is a very active working group with a mailing list that is not for the faint of heart. There will be two sessions and a total of 4.5 hours of meeting time devoted to progressing the agenda. Topics for IETF 93 include known configuration mechanisms, 0-RTT, PSK and resumption, client authentication, and cipher suites among others.

Since the last IETF meeting, the Using TLS in Applications (uta) working group has published two RFCs; RFC 7525 ”Recommendations for Secure Use of Transport Layer Security (TLS) and Datagram Transport Layer Security (DTLS)” (https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc7525) and RFC 7590 “Use of Transport Layer Security (TLS) in the Extensible Messaging and Presence Protocol (XMPP)“ (https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc7590). This meeting will focus on enhanced email privacy and TLS/DTLS security modules.

Finally, I’d like to give a quick plug for the Security Area Advisory Group (saag) session. This is an excellent way to get a quick view of some of the security-related conversations ongoing in the IETF. This week’s session will include CrypTech along with the state of transport security in email and http. All in all, there is much to see and do in the world of Strengthening the Internet for IETF 93.

Related Meetings, Working Groups, and BoFs at IETF 93:

cfrg (Crypto Forum Research Group)
Wednesday, 22 July 2015, 1300-1530, Athens/Barcelona
Agenda: https://tools.ietf.org/agenda/93/agenda-93-cfrg.html
Charter: https://irtf.org/cfrg

tls (Transport Layer Security) WG
Tuesday, 21 July, 2015, 1520-1720, Congress Hall III,
Wednesday, 22 July 2015, 0900-1130, Grand Ballroom
Agenda: https://tools.ietf.org/wg/tls/agenda
Documents: https://tools.ietf.org/wg/tls
Charter: https://tools.ietf.org/wg/tls/charters

uta (Using TLS in Applications) WG
Tuesday, 21 July 2015, 1740-1840, Congress Hall III
Agenda: https://tools.ietf.org/wg/uta/agenda
Documents: https://tools.ietf.org/wg/uta
Charter: https://tools.ietf.org/wg/uta/charter

saag (Security Area Advisory Group)
Thursday, 23 July 2015, 1300-1500, Congress Hall II
Agenda: https://tools.ietf.org/agenda/93/agenda-93-saag.html

Follow Us

There’s a lot going on in Prague, and whether you plan to be there or join remotely, there’s much to monitor. To follow along as we dole out this series of Rough Guide to IETF blog posts, follow us on the Internet Technology Matters blog, Twitter, Facebook, Google+, via RSS, or see http://dev.internetsociety.org/rough-guide-ietf93.

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IETF Open Internet Standards Technology

Rough Guide to IETF 93: Internet Scalability & Performance

In this post I’ll shine a light on some of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) and Internet Research Task Force (IRTF) efforts underway to explore and address more sophisticated ways to use available bandwidth, improve Internet performance, and otherwise efficiently get Internet content to where it needs to be. These groups will all be meeting as part of the IETF 93 meeting in Prague next week.

On the Sunday of IETF meetings, the Education team organises various tutorial sessions, and IETF 93 will include an ‘Introduction to Performance Measurements and Monitoring’ that will provide an overview of IETF work on the topic.

Internet performance is to a large extent governed by the way transport protocols operate, and the tcpm WG will be meeting to discuss proposed new functionality to improve and enhance the working of TCP, the main transport protocol used on the Internet today. One of the advances developed in the tcpm WG, TCP Fast Open, was included in recent announcements by Apple that should provide a big boost to networking performance in their products.

Multipath TCP is another IETF protocol now seeing more widespread deployment in operational networks, and the meeting in Prague will include updates on implementation experiences and new work to use and extend Multipath TCP.

Getting new code deployed in networking stacks is often hard because of uncertainties about how existing hardware and software on the network will react. After a successful Bar BoF meeting in Dallas, the proposed How Ossified is the Protocol Stack? (hops) research group will meet in Prague to discuss measurement techniques and data sources that could help make better engineering decisions to work around some of the ossification in the protocol stack. The hope is that techniques similar to ‘happy eyeballs’ for IPv6 can be used to support deployment of new transport features and protocols.

Packet networks give rise to transient congestion by design and several groups are meeting to discuss different aspects of congestion control and avoidance (aqm and rmcat). For regulators, being able to monitor the performance of networks, and the extent to which congestion or other factors are impacting consumers’ experience of the network is very important. The lmap working group is meeting in Prague to advance their important work on standardizing a large-scale broadband performance measurement infrastructure.

Related Working Groups and BoFs at IETF 93

iccrg (Internet Congestion Control Research Group)
Wednesday, 22 July 2015, 1550-1720, Congress Hall I
Agenda: https://datatracker.ietf.org/meeting/93/agenda/iccrg/
Documents: http://tools.ietf.org/group/irtf/trac/wiki/ICCRG
Charter: https://irtf.org/iccrg

mptcp (Multipath TCP) WG
Tuesday, 21 July 2015, 1300-1500, Berlin/Brussels
Agenda: https://datatracker.ietf.org/meeting/93/agenda/mptcp/
Documents: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/mptcp/
Charter: http://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/mptcp/charter/

tcpm (TCP Maintenance and Minor Extensions) WG
Wednesday, 22 July 2015, 1300-1530, Karlin I/II
Agenda: https://datatracker.ietf.org/meeting/93/agenda/tcpm/
Documents: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/tcpm/
Charter: http://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/tcpm/charter/

hopsrg (Proposed How Ossified is the Protocol Stack?) RG
Friday, 24 July 2015, 0900-1130, Congress Hall III
Agenda: https://datatracker.ietf.org/meeting/93/agenda/hopsrg/
Charter: https://datatracker.ietf.org/doc/charter-irtf-hopsrg/

aqm (Active Queue Management and Packet Scheduling) WG
Monday, 20 July 2015, 1850–1950, Congress Hall I
Agenda: https://datatracker.ietf.org/meeting/93/agenda/aqm/
Documents: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/aqm/
Charter: http://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/aqm/charter/

lmap (Large-Scale Measurement of Broadband Performance) WG
Monday, 20 July 2015, 0900-1130, Athens/Barcelona
Agenda: https://datatracker.ietf.org/meeting/93/agenda/lmap/
Documents: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/lmap/
Charter: http://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/lmap/charter/

rmcat (RTP Media Congestion Avoidance Techniques) WG
Monday, 20 July 2015, 0900-1130, Congress Hall II
Agenda: https://datatracker.ietf.org/meeting/93/agenda/rmcat/
Documents: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/rmcat/
Charter: http://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/rmcat/charter/

Follow Us

There’s a lot going on in Prague, and whether you plan to be there or join remotely, there’s much to monitor. To follow along as we dole out this series of Rough Guide to IETF blog posts, follow us on the Internet Technology Matters blog, Twitter, Facebook, Google+, via RSS, or see http://dev.internetsociety.org/rough-guide-ietf93.

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IETF Improving Technical Security Open Internet Standards Technology

ISOC Rough Guide to IETF 93: Routing Resilience

There is considerable work underway across several IETF working groups to ensure the Internet’s routing infrastructure is more secure and resilient in both the short and long runs. Many of these groups will meet in Prague at IETF 93 next week.

Let me begin, as always, by listing the WGs where security and resilience issues of the global routing system are discussed and solutions are developed. The groups meeting at IETF 93 are: Secure Inter-Domain Routing (SIDR, http://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/sidr/) WG, Global Routing Operations (GROW, http://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/grow/) WG, Inter-Domain Routing Working Group (IDR, http://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/idr/) WG.

Secure Inter-Domain Routing

The SIDR WG focuses on securing inter-domain routing. The overall architecture is based on a Resource PKI (RPKI), which adds an authentication framework to BGP and is an important component of BGP security extensions – BGPSEC, also developed in SIDR WG. This is a key technology for improving trust in the routing infrastructure.

A lot of work has been done, and there are quite a few operational deployments. This results in refinements of the protocols and fixing some of the issues. This is a normal cycle of protocol maturity, when operational experience is fed back into the protocol development, leading to improvements.

For more than a year, participants have been discussing an issue of potential operational fragility in the management of certificates in the RPKI in response to the movement of resources across registries. There is a draft, “RPKI Validation Reconsidered” (http://tools.ietf.org/html/draft-ietf-sidr-rpki-validation-reconsidered), that proposes changes to the certificate validation procedure. While the issue is real, one of the problems is that the implementation of resource transfers in RPKI is not documented and the implications are not clear. To address this, a new draft “Resource Transfer in the Resource Public Key Infrastructure” (https://datatracker.ietf.org/doc/draft-ymbk-sidr-transfer/) has been published and is under discussion.

There are also other types of mistakes a Certificate Authority (CA) or repository operator may make. For example, they may be subject to legal measures that compel actions resulting in generating “bogus” signed objects or removing legitimate repository data. Draft “Adverse Actions by a Certification Authority (CA) or Repository Manager in the Resource Public Key Infrastructure (RPKI)” (https://datatracker.ietf.org/doc/draft-kent-sidr-adverse-actions/) attempts to catalogue such actions and analyze the implications. It will be discussed in Prague.

BGPSEC

There are some movements in the BGPSEC area, too. The BGPSEC protocol specification is in the Working Group Last Call (draft-ietf-sidr-bgpsec-protocol-11). People found a few omissions that are easy to fix, like insecure Address Family Identifiers (AFI) that allow the attacker to confuse IPv4 and IPv6 prefixes that look the same on the wire.

Extra care needs to be taken when making a significant reconfiguration, like Autonomous System (AS) migration when networks are merged, for example. A draft “BGPSec Considerations for AS Migration” (http://tools.ietf.org/html/draft-ietf-sidr-as-migration) discusses this for a common method of AS migration within the BGPSEC protocol.

As a matter of fact, this common method is not trivial, requires some BGP features that are not formally part of the BGP4 protocol specification, and may be vendor-specific in exact implementation. Absent these features, an ISP would be required to coordinate an ASN change with, in some cases, tens of thousands of customers. In particular, as each router is migrated to the new ASN, to avoid an outage due to ASN mismatch the ISP would have to force all customers on that router to change their router configurations to use the new ASN immediately after the ASN change. This is addressed in the draft “Autonomous System Migration Features and Their Effects on the BGP AS_PATH Attribute” (http://datatracker.ietf.org/doc/draft-ietf-idr-as-migration). This draft is being discussed in the IDR WG and is largely parallel to one of the SIDR WG I just mentioned, although addressing different aspects.

Speaking of network reconfigurations and maintenance, one very important requirement is operational continuity, which applies to the two drafts I just mentioned. Even if an ISP has redundant connections, simply taking down or even bringing up a BGP session for maintenance purposes may still induce connectivity losses during the BGP convergence. This is not satisfactory for applications like Voice Over IP, online gaming, or virtual private networks (VPNs). Therefore, a solution is needed for the graceful shutdown of a (set of) BGP session(s) in order to limit the amount of traffic loss during a planned shutdown. Such a solution is described in a draft “Graceful BGP session shutdown” (draft-ietf-grow-bgp-gshut). This draft is now expired because of dependencies on other drafts, not because of the loss of interest, but it is being discussed in the GROW WG.

Routing System Operational Issues

In general, the GROW WG focuses on operational problems associated with the global routing system, such as routing table growth, the effects of interactions between interior and exterior routing protocols, and the effect of operational policies and practices on the global routing system, its security and resilience.

One of the items that originally emerged in the SIDR WG is the so-called “route-leaks”. Simply put, this describes a violation of a “valley-free” routing when, for example, a multi-homed customer “leaks” an announcement from one upstream provider to another one. Since usually customer announcements have the highest priority, unless precautions are taken this results in traffic being passed from one provider to another, bypassing the customer. This sets the stage for a potential Man in the Middle (MITM) attack. Unfortunately none of the solutions developed in the SIDR WG protect against this type of attack, simply because BGP does not have the ability to signal relationships like customer-provider.

In “Methods for Detection and Mitigation of BGP Route Leaks” (http://datatracker.ietf.org/doc/draft-sriram-idr-route-leak-detection-mitigation/) the authors suggest an enhancement to BGP that would extend the route-leak detection and mitigation capability of BGPSEC. The draft proposes a new Route Leak Protection (RLP) field that operators should set when announcing routes to their customers and peers. Receiving a BGP update that has the RLP field set to ’01’ (‘Do not Propagate Up’) for one or more hops in the AS path from a customer or a peer will indicate that such announcement represents a “route leak” and should be treated accordingly (e.g. by preferring a valid signed update from a peer or an upstream provider over the customer’s update).

Massive DDoS attacks targeting Internet Exchange Point (IXP) members may cause congestion of their peering port(s). In order to limit the impact of such a scenario on legitimate traffic, IXPs adopted a feature called blackholing. A member may trigger blackholing via BGP through the route server. The concept of blackholing at IXPs is similar to blackholing in iBGP scenarios [RFC3882] and expands the concept of Remote Triggered Black Hole (RTBH) filtering [RFC5635]. A draft “BLACKHOLEIXP BGP Community for Blackholing at IXPs” (https://datatracker.ietf.org/doc/draft-ymbk-grow-blackholing/) proposes to define a well-known transitive BGP community, to allow an operator to indicate to the IXP route server which routes should be discarded on the switching fabric of the IXP. The draft and its implications will be discussed in the GROW WG.

Related Working Groups at IETF 93

SIDR (Secure Inter-Domain Routing) WG
Friday, 24 July, 09:00-11:30, Berlin/Brussels
Agenda: https://datatracker.ietf.org/meeting/93/agenda/sidr/
Charter: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/sidr/charter/

GROW (Global Routing Operations) WG
Monday, 20 July, 18:50-19:50, Karlin I/II
Agenda: https://datatracker.ietf.org/meeting/93/agenda/grow/
Charter: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/grow/charter/

IDR (Inter-Domain Routing Working Group) WG
Monday, 20 July, 17:40-18:40, Grand Hilton Ballroom
Friday, 24 July, 11:50-13:20, Grand Hilton Ballroom
Agenda: https://datatracker.ietf.org/meeting/93/agenda/idr/
Charter: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/idr/charter/

Follow Us

There’s a lot going on in Prague, and whether you plan to be there or join remotely, there’s much to monitor. To follow along as we dole out this series of Rough Guide to IETF blog posts, follow us on the Internet Technology Matters blog, Twitter, Facebook, Google+, via RSS, or see http://dev.internetsociety.org/rough-guide-ietf93.

Categories
Growing the Internet IETF Technology

Registration Opens TOMORROW for the ISOC Briefing Panel at IETF 93

As we announced last week, we will once again hold our traditional ISOC@IETF Briefing Panel on Tuesday, 21 July in Prague alongside IETF 93. This time, the topic is Tackling Connectivity Diversity: Protocol Challenges for Constrained Radio Networks and Devices.”

Registration opens TOMORROW, Thursday, 9 July, in two batches at 09:00 UTC and 21:00 UTC for global time zone fairness. Due to high demand for limited seating, pre-registration is required to attend the Briefing Panel in person.

The Briefing Panel will also be webcast and audiocast. No registration is required. Watch this Internet Technology Matters blog or the session page for details.

Abstract

In many areas, Internet connectivity is primarily via low-end mobile devices capable of only 2G or 3G connections to cellular networks. But many application developers live and work with much faster computing platforms and networking environments. Does the infrastructure need to change to accommodate the continuing use of these devices? Is this a transient condition of uneven development, or do we need to re-architect and re-design systems to better cope with connectivity diversity?

Key transports had assumptions built on wireline networks. The next billion users won’t be on wireline networks, and even current users with access to both wireless and wireline networks use wireless networks more often. What does designing for the networks they *will* be on look like – whether at the transport layer or in the application, or at the interface between the two?

In this session during IETF 93, panelists will try to better understand the diversity of Internet connectivity and terminals, and discuss the challenges and responses to these modes of Internet connectivity including:

  • How application developers are dealing with terminal and connectivity diversity
  • Considerations for protocol developers
  • How restricted connectivity impacts user behavior
  • Design principles that could be extrapolated from the data and the technical responses to date
  • How power management and connectivity management interact

Moderator:
TBD, Internet Society

Panelists:
Ted Hardie, independent
Blake Matheny, Facebook
Henning Wiemann, Ericsson

We hope you can join us, either in person or online, for this interesting panel!

Categories
Growing the Internet IETF Technology

At IETF 93, Tackling Connectivity Diversity: Protocol Challenges for Constrained Radio Networks and Devices

Internet connectivity speeds and mobile device capabilities vary across the world, but not all application or protocol developers keep that in mind. How do we address this discrepancy? Does the infrastructure need to change? Is this a temporary condition due to uneven global development? These are some of the questions we’ll discuss during the Internet Society Briefing Panel at IETF 93, entitled: Tackling Connectivity Diversity: Protocol Challenges for Constrained Radio Networks and Devices.”The panel takes place during lunch on Tuesday, 21 July, at the Hilton Prague alongside IETF.

Abstract

In many areas, Internet connectivity is primarily via low-end mobile devices capable of only 2G or 3G connections to cellular networks. But many application developers live and work with much faster computing platforms and networking environments. Does the infrastructure need to change to accommodate the continuing use of these devices? Is this a transient condition of uneven development, or do we need to re-architect and re-design systems to better cope with connectivity diversity?

Key transports had assumptions built on wireline networks. The next billion users won’t be on wireline networks, and even current users with access to both wireless and wireline networks use wireless networks more often. What does designing for the networks they *will* be on look like – whether at the transport layer or in the application, or at the interface between the two?

In this session during IETF 93, panelists will try to better understand the diversity of Internet connectivity and terminals, and discuss the challenges and responses to these modes of Internet connectivity including:

  • How application developers are dealing with terminal and connectivity diversity
  • Considerations for protocol developers
  • How restricted connectivity impacts user behavior
  • Design principles that could be extrapolated from the data and the technical responses to date
  • How power management and connectivity management interact

Moderator:
TBD, Internet Society

Panelists:
Ted Hardie, independent
Blake Matheny, Facebook
Henning Wiemann, Ericsson

Registration & Webcast Information

Pre-registration is required to attend this briefing panel in person, and it always fills up well in advance. Registration will open next week; watch this space or the session page for more information and the registration link.

This event will also be webcast and audiocast. Pre-registration (or IETF attendance) is not required. Again, watch this space or the session page for more information.

We hope you can join us in Prague, or online!