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IETF Open Internet Standards Technology

IETF 91 Starts Today!

We are in Honolulu, Hawaii this week for IETF 91, where we’ll be trying really hard to ignore the beautiful weather and beaches outside and do what we came here to do – make the Internet work better. It all officially kicks off this afternoon with the Welcome Reception from 1700-1900 HST, so I hope we’ll see you there. I hope you’ve been following along as we doled out our series of Rough Guide to IETF91 posts last week. You can read through them all individually at these links if you missed any of them:

A few last-minute reminders as we get this week underway.

IETF Journal v10.2

The latest edition of the IETF Journal is available here onsite in hard copy, and you can subscribe here to receive future issues (via hard copy or email). As you go through the week, keep in mind I’m always on the lookout for ideas for future articles, so if you’re interested in writing something, please send an email to ietfj-editor@isoc.org with more information.

ISOC@IETF Briefing Panel: “Is Identity a Building Block?”

Moderated by ISOC Chief Internet Technology Officer Olaf Kolkman, panelists Leif Johansson, Ken Klingenstein, Jef Hodges, and Natasha Rooney will share their ideas about the question, “Is Identity an Internet Building Block?” Registration to participate in person is full, but the event will be webcast so if you want to watch it online, check back here for details.

The Magnum P.I. Contest

And finally, Olaf Kolkman is running a little contest this week. From his overview ‘rough guide’ post:

“Nerds in Paradise” was the tagline on the t-shirt for the 15th IETF in 1989, the decade when Magnum P.I. dominated TV networks. In honor of our return to Honolulu, the participant with the best “Magnum P.I.” mustache will get an honorary mention in the next issue of the IETF Journal. Photographic evidence can be tweeted to @ISOCtech using the hashtag #ietf91MagnumPI or emailed to itm@isoc.org. (NOTE: Remote IETF 91 participants are eligible, and the winning entry need not be a real mustache!)

Follow Us

There’s a lot going on this week, and whether you are or joining remotely, there’s much to follow. To keep up with our Internet Society activities, follow us on the Internet Technology Matters blog, Twitter, Facebook, Google+, via RSS, or see http://dev.internetsociety.org/rough-guide-ietf91.

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IETF Technology

IETF 80-IETF 90: Some Reflections before IETF 91 in Honolulu

In the past four years, we have awarded nearly 140 first-time and returning Fellowships to the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF).  Twelve IETF meetings into my tenure and I continue to be impressed with the caliber of the individuals who are drawn to the work of open standards, and ultimately the evolution of the Internet.

In speaking with the returning Fellows and those first-timers who seem to get the most out of the experience, certain qualities stand out:

1. Curiosity and wonderment

As mentioned in an earlier blog, one former Fellow noted that “the Internet is Magic.”  This sense of wonderment with what we have at our disposal coupled with a genuine and deep curiosity about how others view the standards work and the world at large is instrumental in remaining open to the possibilities.  Many of our returning Fellows approach the work with an appreciation that others also have viewpoints, sometimes at odds with how they see the world.  That openness to other viewpoints is part of what contributes to how the Internet continues to evolve as a boundless platform.

2. Discipline and commitment

A number of former Fellows have been active contributors to RFCs and become Working Group chairs.  Even as regular attendees, this is hard work.  In the instances with the Fellows, many are contributing to the process via the mailing lists and online.  In addition to the regular jobs they hold in academia, business, and government agencies, they demonstrate discipline and commitment to the standards work.  In a meritocracy such as the IETF, one truly is recognized based on valuable and meaningful contributions. 

3. A pay-it-forward mentality

In the past few cycles, we have noticed more and more applicants noting that they are applying because of their mentors at school or in the workplace.  At least two former Fellows have made it a personal calling to go back to their communities and workplaces to promote the work of the IETF.  They encourage their students and colleagues to get involved.  More importantly, they impart what it takes so that these new voices can hit the ground running — and listening.  This is particularly critical for the Internet, as many of these individuals are coming from places where Internet penetration is low, and an understanding of how new voices can contribute is also not well or broadly understood.  Not surprisingly, these individuals who have made it their calling are also returning Fellows themselves.

That said, we are excited to announce our latest cohort.  Their bios can be found here.  For those at this upcoming meeting, I hope you have a chance to speak with some of the Fellows.   

I am also curious to hear what your thoughts are on other qualities you see in successful participants, Fellows or otherwise.  Let us know in your comments below.

Categories
IETF Improving Technical Security Open Internet Standards Technology

Rough Guide to IETF 91: Strengthening the Internet (STRINT) Activities Continue

The daily news stories and revelations related to pervasive Internet monitoring have slowed in recent months, but the work to strengthen the Internet (STRINT) continues within the Internet community. Now is an excellent time to take a quick look at some of the STRINT-related activities that are being discussed next week at IETF 91 in Honolulu.

First, the Internet Architecture Board (IAB), has established a Privacy and Security Program with three areas of focus: Resilience, Confidentiality, and Trust. While all of these contribute to general strengthening of the Internet, the confidentiality area in particular is actively working on a threat model and problem statement document: “Confidentiality in the Face of Pervasive Surveillance: A Threat Model and Problem Statement.” Additional details about this program will be presented at the IAB Technical Plenary on Monday evening (1850-1750 in Coral 3).

The Security Area Advisory Group (saag) has been discussing terminology over the last several months. This discussion has evolved into a draft with the fabulous title: “Opportunistic Security: Some Protection Most of the Time.” This draft is out for a second IETF Last Call which is scheduled to end on 18 November. Now is an excellent time to review the discussions on the saag and ietf mailing list archives and use the opportunity of the Honolulu face to face time to catch the key protagonists in the hallway to ask those burning questions.

The tls (Transport Layer Security) working group is actively working on an update to the TLS protocol. They just finished a two-day interim meeting in October, and they plan another pre-IETF interim meeting on Sunday (9 November 2014, 9:30 – 13:30) ahead of their regular session on Thursday. For those of you with extra space in your Inbox, this is just the working group for you. (https://www.ietf.org/mail-archive/web/tls/current/maillist.html)

Several additional working groups are taking a second look at how encryption is used within their protocols. While highlighting each one here is a bit too detailed, keep an eye out for those discussions in the individual working group meetings. One that does deserve mention is the relatively new uta (Using TLS in Applications) working group that is specifically tasked with looking at the use of TLS in applications.

The Crypto Forum Research Group is not actually meeting in person during IETF91, but the discussion related to choosing cryptographic curves has been quite active on the mailing list (https://www.ietf.org/mail-archive/web/cfrg/current/maillist.html). A successful open transparent multi-stakeholder (and yes I know those words sometimes seem overused these days, but…) process to establish consensus on cryptographic curves going forward is a key component to strengthening the Internet.

I mentioned this during my comments for IETF90, and while I see there hasn’t been much activity, I’d still like to put in a plug for it because volunteers are badly needed. There is an effort to review existing RFCs for privacy and pervasive monitoring issues. This is an excellent way to read some of those old RFCs that you never got around to. The wiki for that activity is at https://trac.tools.ietf.org/group/ppm-legacy-review/.

Finally, while this isn’t exactly an IETF activity, I’d like to mention that the CrypTech project is making excellent progress in developing an open hardware cryptographic engine. This effort could eventually provide a set of open source cryptographic building blocks along with a trustworthy set of tools to be used to build more secure Internet products. Join the public mailing lists to follow progress.

Related Meetings, Working Groups, and BOFs at IETF 90:

tls (Transport Layer Security) WG
Thursday, 13 Nov 2014, 900-1130, Coral 5
Agenda: https://tools.ietf.org/wg/tls/agenda
Documents: https://tools.ietf.org/wg/tls
Charter: https://tools.ietf.org/wg/tls/charters

uta (Using TLS in Applications) WG
Tuesday, 11 Nov 2014, 900-1130, Coral 2
Agenda: https://tools.ietf.org/wg/uta/agenda
Documents: https://tools.ietf.org/wg/uta
Charter: https://tools.ietf.org/wg/uta/charter

Follow Us

There’s a lot going on next week, and whether you plan to be there or join remotely, there’s much to follow. To follow along as we dole out this series of Rough Guide to IETF blog posts, follow us on the Internet Technology Matters blog, Twitter, Facebook, Google+, via RSS, or see http://dev.internetsociety.org/rough-guide-ietf91.

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IETF Improving Technical Security Mutually Agreed Norms for Routing Security (MANRS) Open Internet Standards Technology

ISOC Rough Guide to IETF 91: Routing Resilience & Security

Improving the overall security, efficiency, and resilience of the Internet’s global routing system will be a hot topic at next week’s IETF 91 meeting in Honolulu. In this post, I’ll share a few of the highlights in some of the IETF Working Groups.

De-aggregation

As the Internet grows, so grows the routing table, although it doesn’t need to grow as fast. Almost half of the IPv4 routing table (45% for IPv4 and 24% for IPv6, to be precise, see http://bgp.potaroo.net/index-cidr.html) contains redundant information. More specific prefixes are announced along with the covering ones, which is called de-aggregation.

Apart from putting extra burden on routers, this growth may case also instability. See, for instance, some observations of what happened when the IPv4 routing table hit the 512K boundary (http://www.bgpmon.net/what-caused-todays-internet-hiccup/, http://www.renesys.com/2014/08/internet-512k-global-routes/).

Some of the causes of de-aggregation are traffic engineering, security concerns (announcing more specifics to win over potentially hijacked prefixes), or simply configuration mistakes. Is there a technical solution to this problem?

Some people think so. One of the proposals “Filtering of Overlapping Routes” published two years ago is aimed at filtering the overlapping routes (longer prefixes) when the rest of the information is the same for the covering prefix. The proposal was discussed in the GROW WG, but it seems it has not gotten enough traction and was not adopted as a WG item.

And while IPv4 may be a lost cause, shouldn’t we follow the same path with IPv6? Ilijtch van Beijnum observes some of the de-aggregation problems in IPv6 that happen when one organization announces different prefixes to different ISPs from its different units that may be geographically distributed. His draft “Controlled IPv6 de-aggregation by large organizations” proposes some solutions.

Route Leaks

Route leaks, a violation of the so-called valley-free routing principle, can undermine security of the routing system by giving an adversary an ability to re-direct traffic targeted to specific destinations. Internet history knows many cases when route leaks caused serious disruptions (see, for instance Geoff Huston’s “Leaking Routes“, or Jim Cowie’s “China’s 18-Minute Mystery“).

This is aggravated by the fact that these anomalies are immune to the solutions being developed in the SIDR WG, i.e. RPKI and BGPSEC (see http://tools.ietf.org/html/draft-ietf-grow-simple-leak-attack-bgpsec-no-help).

Unfortunately we are still lacking a common definition of the term, making discussion of threats and possible solutions difficult. A new draft “Problem Definition and Classification of BGP Route Leaks” makes such an attempt and will be discussed in the GROW WG.

A companion draft “Methods for Detection and Mitigation of BGP Route Leaks” will be discussed in the IDR and SIDR WGs.

SIDR

Since the previous IETF, a draft “RPKI Validation Reconsidered” is being discussed in the SIDR WG. The draft reviews the certificate validation procedure specified in RFC6487 and highlights aspects of potentially acute operational fragility in the management of certificates in the RPKI in response to the movement of resources across registries, and the associated actions of Certification Authorities to maintain continuity of validation of certification of resources during this movement.

To put it simpler, the idea is that if only a subset of the resources specified in the certificate extensions cannot be validated, it doesn’t invalidate the rest of them. From an operational point of view this should increase robustness of the overall system, but it also fundamentally changes the PKI validation process.

In general, as the IETF-developed building blocks are becoming parts of the deployed solutions there is more attention to risks, resilience and robustness of the overall system. Not surprisingly the 2014 ANRP award was given to Sharon Goldberg and her colleagues for the paper “On the Risk of Misbehaving RPKI Authorities“. The paper contains a proposal on how to protect against “Dutch Police Attack” where the RPKI is used for IP prefix takedowns. It is the suspenders proposal that featured in SIDR and will be discussed at the WG session. Depending on the feedback, we may see an I-D.

The development of the BGPSEC protocol continues. And at the upcoming IETF, SIDR and IDR WGs will hold a joint session for the purpose of discussing the BGPSEC protocol.

MANRS

Of course the utility of the developed building blocks, solutions, and practices is only materialized when they are deployed in operators’ networks. And when we talk about the security and resilience of the global routing system, the deployment should match the global scale of it.

This is where technology meets with social and economic facets of the solution. This is where collaboration, shared responsibility, and individual commitment are essential.

Throughout the history of the Internet, collaboration among participants and shared responsibility for its smooth operation have been two of the pillars supporting the Internet’s tremendous growth and success, as well as its security and resilience. And today we, as a community made another important step in this direction, when leading network operators around the world announced that they have implemented a package of recommended measures that help improve the security and resilience of the global Internet. This “package” is documented in the “Mutually Agreed Norms for Routing Security” (MANRS) and it is live on the Internet: https://www.manrs.org). But more about this in another blog post!

Related Working Groups at IETF 91

SIDR (Secure Inter-Domain Routing) WG
Monday, 10 November 2014, 0900-1130 HST, Coral 1
Agenda: https://datatracker.ietf.org/meeting/91/agenda/sidr/
Charter: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/sidr/charter/

GROW (Global Routing Operations) WG
Monday, 10 November 2014, 1730-1830 HST, Coral 4
Agenda: https://datatracker.ietf.org/meeting/91/agenda/grow/
Charter: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/grow/charter/

IDR (Inter-Domain Routing Working Group) WG
Thursday, 13 November 2014, 1300-1500 HST, Kahili
Friday, 14 November 2014, 0900-1130 HST, Coral 2
Agenda: https://datatracker.ietf.org/meeting/91/agenda/idr/
Charter: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/idr/charter/

Follow Us

There’s a lot going on next week, and whether you plan to be there or join remotely, there’s much to follow. To follow along as we dole out this series of Rough Guide to IETF blog posts, follow us on the Internet Technology Matters blog, Twitter, Facebook, Google+, via RSS, or see http://dev.internetsociety.org/rough-guide-ietf91.

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IETF IPv6 Open Internet Standards Technology

Rough Guide to IETF 91: All About IPv6

IPv6 growth continues throughout the world, and the standardization work in the IETF reflects this growth and operational experience. Akamai and Google both publish ongoing statistics about IPv6 deployment showing growth in both individual networks and in countries all around the globe.

At IETF 91 next week in Honolulu, there will be work on IPv6 operations and ongoing maintenance of the IPv6 protocol. In the Rough Guide to IETF 90, my colleague Chris Grundemann called attention also to the Homenet Working Group which is also meeting at this IETF. All of these working groups are advancing open standards to extend and improve deployment and operations of IPv6 in the Internet.

The draft https://tools.ietf.org/html/draft-ietf-v6ops-6to4-to-historic-06 has generated a tremendous amount of discussion on the v6ops mailing list in the last few weeks. This document will be discussed in the first v6ops session on Monday morning. In the afternoon session the draft https://tools.ietf.org/html/draft-ietf-v6ops-design-choices-03 will be discussed. This is an informational draft intended to provide design guidance for operators determining how to go about deploying IPv6 in their networks.

Again at this IETF the Homenet WG has some of the most interesting topics for discussion. This work is focussed on producing open standards for protocols to implement robust networks in the home, all based on IPv6. The topics include routing, addressing, naming, and security. It’s exciting to see new standards work for such a potentially interesting area for extending the reach of open standards in networks that matter to people around the world.

At the Internet Society we continue to promote IPv6 deployment. You can check out the World IPv6 Launch Measurements for our latest measurements of IPv6 around the globe:
http://www.worldipv6launch.org/measurements

Also you can check out our online resources for getting started with IPv6 deployment:
http://dev.internetsociety.org/deploy360/start/
http://dev.internetsociety.org/deploy360/ipv6/

IPv6 Working Groups at IETF 91:

v6ops (IPv6 Operations) WG
Monday, 10 November 900am-1130am, Coral 4
Monday, 10 November 320pm-520pm, Coral 3
Agenda: https://datatracker.ietf.org/meeting/91/agenda/v6ops/
Documents: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/v6ops/documents/
Charter: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/v6ops/charter/

6man (IPv6 Maintenance) WG
Friday, 14 November 9am-1130am, Coral 3
Agenda: https://datatracker.ietf.org/meeting/91/agenda/6man/
Documents: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/6man/documents/
Charter: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/6man/charter/

Homenet (Home Networking) WG
Wednesday, 12 November 9am-1130am, Coral 3
Agenda: https://datatracker.ietf.org/meeting/91/agenda/homenet/
Documents: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/homenet/documents/
Charter: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/homenet/charter/

Follow Us

There’s a lot going on next week, and whether you plan to be there or join remotely, there’s much to follow. To follow along as we dole out this series of Rough Guide to IETF blog posts, follow us on the Internet Technology Matters blog, Twitter, Facebook, Google+, via RSS, or see http://dev.internetsociety.org/rough-guide-ietf91.

Categories
IETF Open Internet Standards Technology

Rough Guide to IETF 91: Bandwidth, Scalability, and Internet Performance

In this post I’ll shine a light on some of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) and Internet Research Task Force (IRTF) efforts underway to explore and address more sophisticated ways to use available bandwidth, improve Internet performance, and otherwise efficiently get content to where it needs to be. These groups will all be meeting as part of the IETF 91 meeting in Honolulu next week.

The Deterministic Networking (detnet) BoF will explore the feasibility of extending IEEE Audio Video Bridging to routed networks. The IEEE standard provides time synchronization and precise scheduling for zero congestion loss and finite latency for reserved layer-2 streams. The need to extend these QoS features to routed networks is now emerging for industrial and vehicular applications. The detnet problem statement contains more detail about the motivations for this work.

Internet performance is to a large extent governed by the way transport protocols operate, and the tcpm WG will be meeting to discuss proposed new functionality to improve and enhance the working of TCP, the main transport protocol used on the Internet today.

Packet networks give rise to transient congestion by design and several groups are meeting to discuss different aspects of congestion control and avoidance (aqm, iccrg and rmcat). For regulators, being able to monitor the performance of networks, and the extent to which congestion or other factors are impacting consumers’ experience of the network is very important. The lmap working group is meeting in Honolulu to advance their important work on standardizing a large-scale broadband performance measurement infrastructure.

Reducing Internet latency is important to us at the Internet Society and in the IRTF, the proposed research group on the subject of data centre latency control (dclcrg) will meet again at IETF 91. In recent years a number of techniques have been documented in the research literature on reducing latency for applications running in large data centres and this research group seeks to develop shared problem statements, solutions and other experimental tools.

Related Working Groups and BoFs at IETF 91

tcpm (TCP Maintenance and Minor Extensions) WG
Monday, 10 November 2014, 0900-1130 HST, Hibiscus
Agenda: https://datatracker.ietf.org/meeting/91/agenda/tcpm/
Documents: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/tcpm/
Charter: http://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/tcpm/charter/

aqm (Active Queue Management and Packet Scheduling) WG
Monday, 10 November 2014, 1300-1500 HST, Coral 2
Agenda: https://datatracker.ietf.org/meeting/91/agenda/aqm/
Documents: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/aqm/
Charter: http://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/aqm/charter/

detnet (Deterministic Networking) BoF
Monday, 10 November 2014, 1520-1720 HST, Coral 1
Agenda: https://datatracker.ietf.org/meeting/91/agenda/detnet/
Draft charter: https://bitbucket.org/pthubert/detnet/src/master/detnet%20charter.txt

dclcrg (Proposed Data Center Latency Control Research Group)
Tuesday, 11 November 2014, 1300-1500 HST, Hibiscus
Agenda: https://datatracker.ietf.org/meeting/91/agenda/dclcrg/

iccrg (Internet Congestion Control Research Group)
Tuesday, 11 November 2014, 1520-1720 HST, Coral 1
Agenda: https://datatracker.ietf.org/meeting/91/agenda/iccrg/
Documents: http://tools.ietf.org/group/irtf/trac/wiki/ICCRG
Charter: https://irtf.org/iccrg

rmcat (RTP Media Congestion Avoidance Techniques) WG
Wednesday, 12 November 2014, 0900-1130 HST, Coral 4
Agenda: https://datatracker.ietf.org/meeting/91/agenda/rmcat/
Documents: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/rmcat/
Charter: http://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/rmcat/charter/

lmap (Large-Scale Measurement of Broadband Performance) WG
Thursday, 13 November 2014, 0900-1130 HST, Kahili
Agenda: https://datatracker.ietf.org/meeting/91/agenda/lmap/
Documents: https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/lmap/
Charter: http://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/lmap/charter/

Follow Us

There’s a lot going on next week, and whether you plan to be there or join remotely, there’s much to follow. To follow along as we dole out this series of Rough Guide to IETF blog posts, follow us on the Internet Technology Matters blog, Twitter, Facebook, Google+, via RSS, or see http://dev.internetsociety.org/rough-guide-ietf91.

 

Categories
IETF Open Internet Standards

Rough Guide to IETF 91: Nerds Return to Paradise

“Nerds in Paradise” was the tagline on the t-shirt for the 15th IETF in 1989, the decade when “Magnum P.I.” dominated TV networks. (Photo credit: Kathy Kerby & Ben Littauer.) Next week, the IETF will return to Honolulu for IETF 91 to do what nerds do (whether they are in paradise or not): make the Internet better.

The Internet Society will once again be providing its traditional ‘rough guide’ in a series of blog posts. Leading up to the start of IETF 91, we will be posting on matters that are of mutual interest: Scalability & Performance; Routing Resilience; DNSSEC, DANE, and DNS Security; Trust, Identity, and Privacy; and Strengthening the Internet. All these posts can be found, and will be archived, through our Rough Guide to IETF 91 overview page at https://dev.internetsociety.org/rough-guide-ietf91.

Below I am giving an overview of some of the activities that the Internet Society is involved in and some of my personal highlights.

IETF Journal

Before we get to IETF91, let me first tell you that Volume 10, issue 2 of the IETF Journal is available. You can pick up a hard copy at the meeting or download it from https://dev.internetsociety.org/publications/ietf-journal-november-2014. This issue reports on IETF90 in Toronto. Among other things it features articles on Autonomic NetworkingInformation Routing on Content Locators, and reports from the Internet Architecture Board (IAB) plenary on the Interaction between Internet and geographical topology in Experts Say Economics and Politics Hamper Efficient Routing of Internet Dataand a report on the IETF briefing panel that provided an outlook on Internet security and privacy.

IRTF and ANRP

Just as the IAB, the Internet Research Task Force (IRTF) is part of the IETF family, and a few of its research groups will be meeting. Through the Applied Networking Research Prize(ANRP, supported by ISOC) the IRTF recognizes the best new ideas in networking, and brings them to the IETF, especially in cases where the ideas are relevant for transitioning into shipping Internet products and related standardization efforts. This time, three talented researchers will present during the IRTF sessions:

  • Sharon Goldberg discusses threats when BGP RPKI authorities are faulty, misconfigured, compromised, or compelled to misbehave
  • Tobias Flach presents a design of novel loss recovery mechanisms for TCP that minimize timeout-driven recovery
  • Misbah Uddin shares how he and his coworkers developed matching and ranking for network search queries to make operational data available in real-time to management applications.
ISOC@IETF

The ISOC@IETF briefing panels intend to step away from the day-to-day work at the IETF and look at Internet technology development from a bit of a conceptual distance. This time panelists Leif Johansson, Ken Klingenstein, Jef Hodges, and Natasha Rooney will share their ideas about the question, “Is Identity an Internet Building Block?” We hope to step away with an idea on how identifiers and attributes we use on the Internet today relate to our ideas of ‘identity.’

Noteworthy

One of the week’s highlights is the technical plenary on Monday during which the IAB will highlight two of its programs: the IP stack evolution program and the Security and Privacy program.

For getting a feel of work that might be happening at the IETF, it is always useful to look at the Birds of a Feather (BoF) sessions. There are six of those:

  1. Bit Indexed Explicit Replication (BIER). If you are from the Netherlands or Germany: be careful not to let the name of this group fool you. The purpose of this group is to discuss a new architecture for the forwarding of multicast data packets.
  2. Deterministic Networking (DETNET) looks into making quality of service features that exist in IEEE 802 for bridging audio and video available in routers.
  3. Autonomic Networking Integrated Model and Approach (ANIMA) looks at methods to get self-managing characteristics such as configuration, protection, healing, and optimization into operational networks.
  4. Abstraction and Control of Networks (ACTN) aims to facilitate centralized operation and construction of virtual networks based on multi-subnet, multi-technology, multi-vendor domain networks.
  5. Archive Top Level Media Type (ARCMEDIA) is a non-working group forming BoF attempting to register a top-level media type for file archives, i.e., formats that package files and file metadata into a single data stream.
  6. Interface to Network Security Functions (I2NSF) is also not working group forming. Here one will discuss interfaces for clients (especially enterprises) to request, negotiate, operate, and/or verify the network security functions that are not physically present at requesters’ premises.

Perhaps these one-line descriptions are sufficient to trigger your interest. If you want to know what these BoFs are about then a visit to the IETF BoF page is warranted. 

Magnum P.I. Contest

Finally, a little contest: The participant with the best “Magnum P.I.”-inspired mustache will get an honorary mention in the next issue of the IETF Journal. Photographic evidence can be tweeted to @ISOCtech using the hashtag #ietf91MagnumPI or emailed to itm@isoc.org. (NOTE: Remote IETF 91 participants are eligible, and the winning entry need not be a real mustache!)

Follow Us

There’s a lot going on next week, and whether you plan to be there or join remotely, there’s much to follow. To follow along as we dole out this series of Rough Guide to IETF blog posts, follow us on the Internet Technology Matters blogTwitterFacebookGoogle+, via RSS, or see http://dev.internetsociety.org/rough-guide-ietf91.