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Internet Governance

Future of Internet Cooperation

Excerpt from Lynn St. Amour’s speech at the Seoul Conference on Cyberspace 2013

(…) Earlier this month, the leaders of organizations responsible for the management and coordination of the Internet’s technical infrastructure met in Montevideo, Uruguay.

They noted that the Internet and World Wide Web were both built and governed in the public interest through unique mechanisms for global multistakeholder Internet cooperation, and this has been intrinsic to their success.  We discussed the clear need to continually strengthen and evolve these mechanisms, to be able to address emerging issues. In fact, this is why we refer to the Internet Ecosystem – it is continually evolving.
Specifically,

  • We reinforced the importance of globally coherent Internet operations, and warned against Internet fragmentation at a national level. We expressed strong concern over the undermining of the trust and confidence of Internet users globally due to recent revelations of pervasive monitoring and surveillance.
  • We identified the need for ongoing effort to address Internet Governance challenges, and agreed to catalyze community-wide efforts towards the evolution of global multistakeholder Internet cooperation.  In this regard, the outputs from WSIS and the IGF to be held in Indonesia next week will play a central part.
  • We called for accelerating the globalization of ICANN and IANA functions, towards an environment in which all stakeholders, including all governments, participate in their respective ”expert” roles.

Now more than ever, it is imperative that the Internet community and the international community join forces to ensure that appropriate policies are collaboratively developed and fairly implemented, and that restrictive or harmful policies are not pursued. The multistakeholder Internet governance principles that have come to define the Internet must be preserved and extended.

The Internet has tremendous potential for economic and social good, but unless all stakeholders trust the Internet as a safe place for business, social interaction, academic enquiry, and self-expression, those economic and social benefits are all put at risk.

Read the full speech